Daily Archives: September 10, 2010

The Next Generation and Guyana

THE NEXT GENERATION OF DIASPORIANS WILL HAVE LESS TIES TO GUYANA

Excerpt from: August 10, 2010 | By KNews | Columnists, Peeping Tom

In our international perspective this week, we examine the need for greater integration of sports between members of the Diaspora and local sporting organizations. ……….

There is another important reason why such integration is necessary. Those who have had the experience of living in Guyana and who have migrated, still have emotional and physical ties to Guyana. But a whole new generation is emerging within the Diaspora.

They are the children and grandchildren of Guyanese immigrants, and they have had little or no attachment to Guyana. Within the next ten years, these persons who are descendants of Guyanese, but have not ever lived or for that matter ever visited Guyana, are going to outnumber those who migrated from these shores.

Unless therefore, a way can be found to create greater links between these persons and Guyana, we may well end up with a situation where these persons would in time have little or no attachment to Guyana. And considering the economic value of remittances from the Diaspora, we can very well over the next ten years see a decline in the level of these remittances.

Without these resources the Guyanese economy is going to shrivel. We should therefore act now to integrate the Diaspora into our society and economy. Through sports we can begin this process.

Read full article :  THE NEXT GENERATION OF DIASPORIANS WILL HAVE LESS TIES TO GUYANA

Victoria’s historic Model of Village Governance

Victoria’s historic Model of Village Governance

Copyright. 2007.  Excerpt from a new book on The Guyana Villages by Eusi Kwayana.

The book by Mr William Arno, stalwart head teacher, and Inspector of Schools, educationist, famous in his time, gives us much I formation about the First post emancipation village in Guyana. In particular it lists the 83 original proprietors, who took the simple step of buying a village to be controlled by persons who had been enslaved up to 1834 and lawlessly forced to work for another four years until 1838.

Taking over land by purchase and setting up a new mini -civilization called a village was not a cake walk.  We often forget that the colonizers and the Sugar directors and Attorneys had passed laws to make it difficult for the emancipated men and women to acquire land. As the rulers saw it, when Africans got land the plantations would lose labour.  Continue reading

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