Author Archives: guyaneseonline

Parliament date awaiting outcome of Ramotar, Granger talks – Teixeira

Parliament

Parliament Building – Georgetown. Guyana

Parliament date awaiting outcome of Ramotar, Granger talks – Teixeira

Government Chief Whip Gail Teixeira today confirmed that her acquiescence to a date for the sitting of the National Assembly is awaiting the outcome of the ongoing engagement between the President Donald Ramotar and Leader of the Opposition David Granger.

Her statement in response to accusations from Opposition Chief Whip Amna Ally lends greater credence to views that the government and APNU are trying to strike a deal which would stave off the no-confidence motion which the AFC intends to pilot at the first sitting following the end of the parliamentary recess.

Teixeira’s statement follows:    Continue reading

NASCAR champion Kurt Busch joins ROC 2014 field in Barbados

NASCAR champion Kurt Busch joins ROC 2014 field in Barbados
Published on October 25, 2014 – Caribbean News Now

kurt_busch.jpg

NASCAR champion Kurt Busch

BUSHY PARK, Barbados — American NASCAR superstar Kurt Busch has happily accepted the invitation to participate in the 2014 Race Of Champions, to be held at the Bushy Park Circuit in Barbados on December 13-14.

Busch has been a major force in America’s most popular racing series ever since he became the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series Champion in 2004, the first year the 10-race Chase for the title was introduced. He has now amassed 25 top flight wins, including victory at this year’s STP 500 at the Martinsville Speedway in Virginia.   Continue reading

Ganja And The Caribbean Tourism Industry – By David Jessop

Ganja And The Caribbean Tourism Industry

Ganga article pix

Thousands turn out annually for The Seattle Hemp fest, in Washington state. (edipure.com image)

By David Jessop

News Americas, LONDON, England, Fri. Oct. 17, 2014: A debate is just beginning that is unlikely to reach a conclusion anytime soon. It relates to ganja and tourism and follows from the decision by Jamaica, and in time possibly others in the Caribbean, to decriminalise the holding of small quantities of marijuana and its use for medicinal and religious purposes.

The measure, which in Jamaica is domestic in its intent, responds to long standing pressure for change but may well , for a variety of reasons, come to be a form of tourism attraction.

In the US, where the states of Colorado and Washington have legalised the narcotic, reports in the local and national media suggest that this is resulting in a surge in visitor arrivals and an upturn in tax revenues. Although it is clear that events like ‘Hempfest’ in Seattle attract around 30,000 participants to sample product competing for an annual cannabis cup, officials argue that inter-state marijuana tourism remains a myth.  Continue reading

Brazil’s presidential election -Why Brazil needs change

Brazil’s presidential election -Why Brazil needs change

Voters should ditch Dilma Rousseff and elect Aécio Neves

Oct 18th 2014 | The Economist

IN 2010, when Brazilians elected Dilma Rousseff as president, their country seemed at last to be living up to its huge potential. The economy expanded by 7.5% that year, setting the seal on eight years of faster growth and a steep fall in poverty under Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, Ms Rousseff’s political mentor and the leader of the centre-left Workers’ Party (PT). But four years later that promise has disappeared. Under Ms Rousseff the economy has stalled and social progress has slowed. Sanctions-hit Russia aside, Brazil is by far the weakest performer in the BRIC club of big emerging economies. In June 2013 over a million Brazilians took to the streets to protest against poor public services and political corruption.

Ever since the protests the polls have shown that two-thirds of respondents want the next president to be different. So one might have expected them to turf out Ms Rousseff in the first round of the country’s presidential election on October 5th. In the event she secured 41.6% of the vote and remains the narrow favourite to win the run-off ballot on October 26th. Continue reading

Chikungunya in the Caribbean: A backgrounder

Chikungunya in the Caribbean: A backgrounder 

Blood sucking Aedes mosquito with blood at its stomach

Deborah Almond, Antillean Media Group

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, Thursday October 16, 2014, AMG  - Chikungunya (CHIKV) was detected for the first time in the western hemisphere in December 2013 and has since swept across the Caribbean causing increasing sickness and economic disruption. The number of people infected across the Americas now stands at more than 13,180 people as confirmed by laboratory testing with an additional 739,400 suspected cases. Here’s what you should know about CHIKV.

What is CHIKV and where did it come from?

CHIKV is caused by a virus belonging to the alphavirus genus of the family Togaviridae and is made up of a single strand of RNA (rather than the familiar DNA double helix). This means it’s able to replicate inside human and mosquito cells and causes sickness by corrupting their regular DNA. CHIKV is genetically similar to Ross River Virus (RRV) and O’nyong’nyong virus (ONNV) and has been diagnosed in almost 40 countries mainly in tropical and subtropical regions across the world. Continue reading

Dancing in the Rain – a story about “Life”

Dancing in The Rain


It was a busy
morning, about 8:30, when an elderly

gentleman in his 80’s arrived to have
stitches removed from his thumb.

He said he was in a hurry as he had an
appointment at 9:00 am.

I took his vital signs and had him take a seat,

knowing it would be over an hour

before someone would to able to see him.  Continue reading

Cheaper oil- Many winners, a few bad losers

Cheaper oil- Many winners, a few bad losers

A lower price will boost the world economy and harm some unpleasant regimes—but there are risks

Crude oil prices -2014

Crude oil prices -2014

Oct 25th 2014 | The Economist magazine

THE collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991 had many causes. None was as basic as the fall in the price of oil, its main export, by two-thirds in real terms between 1980 and 1986. By the same token, the 14-year rule of Vladimir Putin, heir to what remained, has been bolstered by a threefold rise in the oil price.

Now the oil price is falling again. Since June, it has dropped from about $115 for a barrel of Brent crude to $85 or so—a reduction of roughly a quarter. If prices settle at today’s level, the bill for oil consumers will be about $1 trillion a year lower. That would be a shot in the arm for a stagnating world economy. It would also have big political consequences. For some governments it would be a rare opportunity; for others, a threat.

The scale of shale

Predicting oil prices is a mug’s game (we speak from experience). The fall of the past three months is partly the result of unexpected—and maybe short-lived—developments. Who would have guessed that chaotic, war-torn Libya would somehow be pumping 40% more oil at the end of September than it had just a month earlier? Saudi Arabia’s decision to boost output to protect its market share and hurt American shale producers and see off new developments in the Arctic was also a surprise. Perhaps the fall was exaggerated by hedge-fund investors dumping oil they had been holding in the false expectation of rising prices.

Geopolitical shocks can surprise on the upside as well as the down. Saudi Arabia may well decide to resume its self-appointed post as swing producer and cut output to push prices up once more. With war stalking Iraq, Libya still fragile and Nigeria prey to insurgency (see article), supply is vulnerable to chaotic forces.

But many of the causes of lower prices have staying power. The economic malaise weighing down on demand is not about to lift, despite the tonic of cheaper oil (see article). Conservation, spurred by high prices and green regulation, is more like a ratchet than a piece of elastic. The average new car consumes 25% less petrol per mile than ten years ago. Some observers think the rich world has reached “peak car”, and that motoring is in long-term decline. Even if they are wrong, and lower prices encourage people to drive more, energy-saving ideas will not suddenly be uninvented.

Much of the extra supply is baked in, too. Most oil investment takes years of planning and, after a certain point, cannot easily be turned off. The fracking revolution is also likely to rage on. Since the start of 2010 the United States, the main winner, has increased its output by more than 3m barrels per day to 8.5m b/d. Shale oil is relatively expensive, because it comes from many small, short-lived wells. Analysts claim that a third of wells lose money below $80 a barrel, so shale-oil production will adjust, helping put a floor under the price. But the floor will sag. Break-even points are falling. In past price squeezes, oilmen confounded the experts by finding unimagined savings. This time will be no different.

For governments in consuming countries the price fall offers some budgetary breathing-room. Fuel subsidies hog scandalous amounts of money in many developing countries—20% of public spending in Indonesia and 14% in India (including fertiliser and food). Lower prices give governments the opportunity to spend the money more productively or return it to the taxpayers. This week India led the way by announcing an end to diesel subsidies. Others should follow Narendra Modi’s lead.

The axis of diesel

For those governments that have used the windfall revenues from higher prices to run aggressive foreign policies, by contrast, things could get uncomfortable. The most vulnerable are Venezuela, Iran and Russia.

The first to crack could be Venezuela, home to the anti-American “Bolivarian revolution”, which the late Hugo Chávez tried to export around his region. Venezuela’s budget is based on oil at $120 a barrel. Even before the price fall it was struggling to pay its debts. Foreign-exchange reserves are dwindling, inflation is rampant and Venezuelans are enduring shortages of everyday goods such as flour and toilet paper.

Iran is also in a tricky position. It needs oil at about $140 a barrel to balance a profligate budget padded with the extravagant spending schemes of its former president, Mahmoud Ahmedinejad. Sanctions designed to curb its nuclear programme make it especially vulnerable. Some claim that Sunni Saudi Arabia is conspiring with America to use the oil price to put pressure on its Shia rival. Whatever the motivation, the falling price is certainly having that effect.

Compared with these two, Russia can bide its time. A falling currency means that the rouble value of oil sales has dropped less than its dollar value, cushioning tax revenues and limiting the budget deficit. The Kremlin can draw on money it has saved in reserve funds, though these are smaller than they were a few years ago and it had already budgeted to run them down. Russia can probably cope with today’s prices for 18 months to two years, but the money will eventually run out. Mr Putin’s military modernisation, which has absorbed 20% of public spending, looks like an extravagance. Sanctions are stifling the economy and making it hard to borrow. Poorer Russians will be less able to afford imported food and consumer goods. If the oil price stays where it is, it will foster discontent.

Democrats and liberals should welcome the curb the oil price imposes on countries like Iran, Venezuela and Russia. But there is also an increased risk of instability. Iran’s relatively outward-looking president, Hassan Rouhani, was elected to improve living standards. If the economy sinks, it could strengthen the hand of his hardline opponents. Similarly, a default in Venezuela could have dire consequences not just for Venezuelans but also for the Caribbean countries that have come to depend on Bolivarian aid. And Mr Putin, deprived of economic legitimacy, could well plunge deeper into the xenophobic nationalism that has fuelled his campaign in Ukraine. Cheaper oil is welcome, but it is not trouble-free.

New York City doctor diagnosed with Ebola … after treating patients in Africa

New York City doctor diagnosed with Ebola

Thursday, 23 October 2014 21:52  -Written by 

Dr. Craig Spencer and his girlfriend, Morgan DixonPicture: Dr. Craig Spencer and his girlfriend, Morgan Dixon


(NEW YORK POST) A Harlem doctor who recently treated patients in Africa, tested positive for the deadly disease after he was rushed to Bellevue Hospital with symptoms, including a 103-degree fever, sources told The Post.

Craig Spencer, a 33-year-old Doctors Without Borders volunteer, began showing symptoms one night after he was out bowling in Brooklyn, police sources said.

Spencer and his live-in girlfriend, Morgan Dixon, 30, were both quarantined at Bellevue at noon Thursday as cops retraced their steps since the doctor returned from Guinea on Oct. 17, the sources said. Continue reading

TRIUMPH OF THE “UNDERCLASS” – By Hubert Williams

TRIUMPH  OF  THE  “UNDERCLASS”

               By  Hubert  Williams

Boston, Massachusetts, October 21, 2014 — In 2003, in a lengthy document sent the office of Mrs. Hillary Rodham Clinton, reacting to her extremely well presented book “Living History”, I had expressed misgivings over societal weaknesses and the emerging role of well-educated, highly-placed working women which could have the unintended consequence under Democracy of an ‘underclass’ literally controlling small jurisdictions such as those in the English-speaking Caribbean… and, in the fullness of time, large jurisdictions, too.

She is absolutely a “women’s libber” and a very strong proponent of an education system which separates girls and boys, particularly at the secondary and tertiary levels. Of her own experience at Wellesley College in Boston (one of the world’s foremost women’s universities), she wrote:

“Unlike some of the smart girls in my high school, who felt pressure to forsake their own ambitions for more traditional lives, my Wellesley classmates wanted to be recognized for their ability, hard work and achievements. This may explain why there is a disproportionate number of women’s college graduates in professions in which women tend to be under-represented.” Continue reading

Guyana’s Queens College to mark 170th anniversary – By Tangerine Clarke

Guyana’s Queens College to mark 170th anniversary

By Tangerine Clarke  – Caribbean Life – NYC

Enlarge this image

QC alumni -NYC 2014

Queen’s College Alumni Association NYC Chapter Executive Committee. From left front: Carol Cort, John Campbell and Jeremy Jordon. From left back: Clive English, Wayne King, Louis Kilkenny and Lex Brian LaRose. (Photo by Tangerine Clarke)

“Faithful and Useful Everywhere” is the motto of the Queen’s College of Guyana Alumni Association and that will be on the minds of members of the New York Chapter, when they join other past students in commemorating the institution’s 170th Anniversary. Continue reading

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