Category Archives: Education

Can we prevent the end of the world? – by Martin Rees, Astrophysicist

Can we prevent the end of the world? Martin Rees Astrophysicist

Martin Rees Astrophysicist
Lord Martin Rees, one of the world’s most eminent astronomers, is an emeritus professor of cosmology and astrophysics at the University of Cambridge and the UK’s Astronomer Royal. He is one of our key thinkers on the future of humanity in the cosmos. Full bio

A post-apocalyptic Earth, emptied of humans, seems like the stuff of science fiction TV and movies. But in this short, surprising talk, Lord Martin Rees asks us to think about our real existential risks — natural and human-made threats that could wipe out humanity. As a concerned member of the human race, he asks: What’s the worst thing that could possibly happen?  View video below: Continue reading

The Mapmaker’s Dilemma – By Barry Evans

From the beginning, mapmakers have had to contend with the problems inherent in translating the surface of a three-dimensional spherical object (the Earth) to the flat plane of a map. Barry Evans at The North Coast Journal takes a look at the “tearing” versus “stretching” methods of map-drawing, as epitomized in Bucky’s Dymaxion Map and the Mercator Projection, respectively.

Commons Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion world map, which can be folded to make a regular 20-sided icosahedron (one of the five "Platonic solids").

Commons
Buckminster Fuller’s Dymaxion world map, which can be folded to make a regular 20-sided icosahedron (one of the five “Platonic solids”).

The Mapmaker’s Dilemma  – By

If you’re over 50, chances are the obligatory world maps hanging in your classrooms were based on the Mercator projection. You probably remember it: Greenland, which is 14 times smaller than Africa, appears to be the same size as the continent. And Europe looks twice as large as South America, instead of half the size, as it really is.

Dutchman Gerard Mercator, as smart a businessman as he was a mapmaker, would have been appalled if he knew his map projection was used to educate children in geography, since it was never intended as anything like an accurate depiction of the globe.

The English title of his 1569 map (the first world map to use what we now call the Mercator projection) is “A New and Enlarged Description of the Earth with Corrections for Use in Navigation.”   Continue reading

African-Guyanese traditions need to be revived and cherished – by Murphy Browne

African-Guyanese traditions need to be revived and cherished

Jane engage and she tink nobady like she
Jane engage and she tink nobady like she
Run a kokah dam someting bruk away
Run a kokah dam
Jane engage and she walk the village wid style
O run a kokah dam someting bruk away
Run a kokah dam

From Guyanese kwe-kwe song “Jane Engage”

Singing and dancing to kwe-kwe songs is an important part of some African Guyanese pre-wedding celebration. The songs are sung in the Guyanese Creolese language which is derived from several Central African and West African languages combined with the languages of the Europeans who enslaved Africans. The kwe-kwe pre-wedding celebration does not seem to have a corresponding ceremony in any present-day African nation which suggests it was probably derived from a combination of African ceremonies. 

Continue reading

Re-imagining school – Playlist (13 talks): TED videos

       Playlist (13 talks): Re-imagining school

All over the world, there’s a growing consensus that our education systems are broken. These educators offer lessons in how we might re-imagine school.

  • 19:24

    Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.
  • 20:27

    Salman Khan talks about how and why he created the remarkable Khan Academy, a carefully structured series of educational videos offering complete curricula in math and, now, other subjects. He shows the power of interactive exercises, and calls for teachers to consider flipping the traditional classroom script — give students video lectures to watch at home, and do “homework” in the classroom with the teacher available to help.

A short intro to the Studio School – By Geoff Mulgan video

A short intro to the Studio School- By Geoff Mulgan

“What kind of school would have the teenagers fighting to get in, not fighting to stay out?”

Some kids learn by listening; others learn by doing. Geoff Mulgan gives a short introduction to the Studio School, a new kind of school in the UK where small teams of kids learn by working on projects that are, as Mulgan puts it, “for real.”

More info on Studio Schools:

http://www.studioschoolstrust.org/category/location/studio-schools

What can USA and British education systems learn from classrooms in the developing world?

What can the American and British education systems learn from classrooms in the developing world? inc videos

Posted by: Kate Torgovnick May August 14, 2014 at 10:59 am EDT
A group of students in Karakati, India, research the answer to a big question at one location of Sugata Mitra's School in the Cloud. According to Mitra and Adam Braun, there's a lot that Western schools can learn about education from students in India.

Students in Phaltan, India, research the answer to a big question at one of Sugata Mitra’s School in the Cloud labs. According to Mitra and his Microsoft Work Wonders Project partner, Adam Braun, there’s quite a bit that Western schools can learn from classrooms in the developing world.

Adam Braun went to school in the US and now runs a nonprofit that builds schools in Ghana, Laos, Nicaragua and Guatemala. In contrast, Sugata Mitra—the winner of the 2013 TED Prize—went to school in India and now is a professor in the UK, where his research on self-directed learning routinely brings him into elementary schools.
Both of these education activists have seen how typical classrooms function in the Western world, and both have seen how typical classrooms function in the developing world. And both say, the West isn’t always better.Braun and Mitra have teamed up through Microsoft’s Work Wonders Project to bring Mitra’s School in the Cloud learning platform into Braun’s Pencils of Promise schools. As the two pilot their partnership in a school in rural Ghana, we got them together via Skype to talk through a bold question: what can the West learn from the developing world when it comes to education? Their conversation is packed with insights.   Continue reading

Research study: The impact of migration on the reproductive health of women – HELP!

Research study: The impact of migration on the reproductive health of women – HELP!

From: Shamelle Richards: shamelle@uw.edu

 To Guyanese Online: 

Thank you for your help! It is deeply appreciated.

Here is the basic introduction to my project:

I am an undergraduate student researcher in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Washington. My specialization is medical anthropology.

I am currently looking for participants for a research study examining the impact of migration on the reproductive health of women from the English-speaking Caribbean. Studies have shown that immigrants from the non-Hispanic Caribbean have some of the worst pregnancy-related reproductive health outcomes, including an increased risk for pre-term births, low birth weight infants, and gestational diabetes. Women from Guyana and Trinidad are particularly vulnerable.  Continue reading

Hidden miracles of the natural world – Louie Schwartzberg – TED video

Louie Schwartzberg: Hidden miracles of the natural world

Published on Apr 9, 2014 - We live in a world of unseeable beauty, so subtle and delicate that it is imperceptible to the human eye. To bring this invisible world to light, filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg bends the boundaries of time and space with high-speed cameras, time lapses and microscopes.

At TED2014, he shares highlights from his latest project, a 3D film titled “Mysteries of the Unseen World,” which slows down, speeds up, and magnifies the astonishing wonders of nature.

Toronto Foundation- Dinner & Dance flyers – September 13, 2014

“Helping to Feed and Educate Underprivileged Students in Guyana”

TORONTO FOUNDATION

IN CONJUNCTION WITH

CANADIAN VISION CARE – GUYANA TEAM

CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO OUR

12th ANNIVERSARY – DINNER & DANCE

IN AID OF HELPING TO FEED AND EDUCATE UNDERPRIVILEGED STUDENTS IN GUYANA   … AND

BRINGING THE GIFT OF SIGHT TO THE PEOPLE OF GUYANA BY THE CANADIAN VISION CARE – GUYANA TEAM

Date: Saturday, September 13th, 2014

Place               NEW LOCATION (MISSISSAUGA)

Payal Banquet Hall -3410 Semenyk Crt. Miss. ON Continue reading

CIMBUX: 1st Economic Development Seminar – June 29, 2014

CIMBUX Inc. 1ST ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SEMINAR

 BUXTON/ FRIENDSHIP ON SUNDAY, JUNE 29th 2014.

Attendees at CIMBUX Economic Development Meeting

Attendees at CIMBUX Economic Development Seminar

On Sunday June 29th, 2014 Cimbux Inc. {Committee for the Improvement of Buxton Inc.) held its 1st “Economic Development Conference” at the Friendship Primary School, Friendship Village, East Coast Demerara, Guyana. The theme was “Reviving Buxton/ Friendship Village Economy” and fostering sustainable development for Vigilance, Annandale, and the surrounding villages.

The seminar was sponsored based on the decline in the Social and Economic conditions in the villages over the years. It was coordinated by Mr. Keith Easton- Vice President, of Cimbux Inc. of the U.S.A, and Guyana’s, Mr. Deon Abrams, Educator, Community Activist, and TV host, along with Assistant Co-ordinator, Ms. Yvette Herod, Community Activist and Founder of Toucan 11 Multipurpose club in Buxton. Both persons are honorees of Cimbux Inc. Continue reading

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