Category Archives: Education

West Indian American Business and Cultural Expo – NYC – Oct 4, 2014

EXPO_2014-comp

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Smart kids’ life advice – Playlist (7 video talks)

Playlist (7 talks)

Smart kids’ life advice

These young speakers encourage us to ask bold questions, think creatively and dream big. It’s spot-on life advice that adults may just want to listen to.

Playlist (7 talks): Smart kids’ life advice

  • 8:12

    Child prodigy Adora Svitak says the world needs “childish” thinking: bold ideas, wild creativity and especially optimism. Kids’ big dreams deserve high expectations, she says, starting with grownups’ willingness to learn from children as much as to teach.

Education: Buxton teen awarded for exceptional performance at CSEC

Buxton teen awarded for exceptional performance at CSEC

September 13, 2014 | By KNews | Rehanna Ramsay

In honour of his late grandmother Annie Daniels, overseas-based Guyanese Professor Kerwin Kofi Charles continues to support youth and community development at Buxton, East Coast Demerara.

Shaunelle Thomas

Second from right, Shaunelle Thomas receives the Annie Daniels Memorial Award from Shebiki Beaton, flanked by her parents and representatives of the award Reuben and Paulette Charles.

Mr. Charles, who hails from Buxton, is a Distinguished Service Professor and Deputy Dean at the University of Chicago in the United States.   Continue reading

An exceptional and innovative talent for management… Earl B. John is a ‘Special Person’

An exceptional and innovative talent for management… Earl B. John is a ‘Special Person’

SEPTEMBER 7, 2014 | BY KNEWS |

Earl John

Earl John

“Out of that group of 67 men (The Penumbrians), over time, we produced a president, (Desmond Hoyte) two Ministers of Foreign Affairs, (Rashleigh Jackson and Rudy Insanally) several diplomats, including Rudy Collins, and a principal of Queen’s College; (M.T. Lowe) in addition we’ve had reams of outstanding people, lawyers, doctors, and athletes. We were an indigenous group, (no overseas connections) and we all excelled in our personal lives.” 

By Dennis Nichols

The life experiences of this week’s special person, Earl B. John, may be aptly described as multi-layered. His vocation and interests range from public service to poetry, and embrace human resource management, organization design, community development, sports, creative writing, and instructive letters-to-the-editor penned in local newspapers.
Additionally, he is authoring a projected volume enigmatically titled ‘Being personal with Sugar’, an allusion to his long, productive career with Bookers Sugar Estates, and the Guyana Sugar Corporation (GuySuCo).   Continue reading

Pamela Bridgewater – Educator with a Vision – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Pamela Bridgewater – Educator with a Vision -By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Pamela Bridgewater

Pamela Bridgewater

She is quiet and unassuming but she had a sharp and enquiring mind. She is always thinking as to how she can improve the lives of children the world over. Pamela Bridgewater is a hero in the education system in Guyana. She has now brought her skills and commitment to New York where she is respected by the staff and students alike.

Pamela was born in Soesdyke on the East Bank of Demerara in Guyana. She is the last in a family of four. There are three brothers Aubrey, Samuel and Joe. Pamela’s mother was Minerva and her dad was Wishart. Pamela attended St. Mary’s Anglican School where she did well and her secondary school was at Cove and Garden. Her favorite subject was English. Continue reading

Update from Moray House Trust: September 2014 for Guyanese Online

Update from Moray House Trust: September 2014 for Guyanese Online

After a quiet August, Moray House Trust is preparing for a busy few months with several exciting talks, slideshows and concerts in prospect. Clips from the evolutionary biologist Andrew Snyder’s talk are now available on our website and You Tube Channel. The clips offer fascinating insights into the biodiversity of our hinterland and the quirks and characteristics of local species of caiman, iguana, snakes, butterflies and much more.  We particularly recommend the following clips:

The Rupununi River and the Kanuku Mountains

Andrew explains the unique geographic isolation caused by the passage of the Rupununi River through the Kanuku Mountains. YouTube clip below:

 See more videos below  Continue reading

Guyana has the highest suicide rate in the World– WHO – UPDATED

Battling Suicide, the need to educate – Posted: 11 Sep 2014 03:08 PM PDT——————————————————————————————-

UPDATE: Sep 11th 2014  – The Economist Magazine
Suicide – Desperate measures …

When it comes to people taking their own lives, Guyana leads the world
 

GUYANA tends to do disappointingly, but not disastrously, in global rankings.
It comes 121st out of 187 countries on the UN Development Programme’s
human-development index; in the World Economic Forum’s latest
competitiveness rankings, it comes 117th out of 144. But when it comes to
suicide, Guyana is at the worst extreme (see chart).
See the full article
http://www.economist.com/news/americas/21616972-when-it-comes-people-taking-their-own-lives-guyana-leads-world-desperate-measures?fsrc=email_to_a_friend

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UPDATE – The ‘Werther effect’ in juvenile suicide in Guyana

Modern Alphabet taught to kids nowadays – suggestion

New Alphabet

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Can we prevent the end of the world? – by Martin Rees, Astrophysicist

Can we prevent the end of the world? Martin Rees Astrophysicist

Martin Rees Astrophysicist
Lord Martin Rees, one of the world’s most eminent astronomers, is an emeritus professor of cosmology and astrophysics at the University of Cambridge and the UK’s Astronomer Royal. He is one of our key thinkers on the future of humanity in the cosmos. Full bio

A post-apocalyptic Earth, emptied of humans, seems like the stuff of science fiction TV and movies. But in this short, surprising talk, Lord Martin Rees asks us to think about our real existential risks — natural and human-made threats that could wipe out humanity. As a concerned member of the human race, he asks: What’s the worst thing that could possibly happen?  View video below: Continue reading

The Mapmaker’s Dilemma – By Barry Evans

From the beginning, mapmakers have had to contend with the problems inherent in translating the surface of a three-dimensional spherical object (the Earth) to the flat plane of a map. Barry Evans at The North Coast Journal takes a look at the “tearing” versus “stretching” methods of map-drawing, as epitomized in Bucky’s Dymaxion Map and the Mercator Projection, respectively.

Commons Buckminster Fuller's Dymaxion world map, which can be folded to make a regular 20-sided icosahedron (one of the five "Platonic solids").

Commons
Buckminster Fuller’s Dymaxion world map, which can be folded to make a regular 20-sided icosahedron (one of the five “Platonic solids”).

The Mapmaker’s Dilemma  – By

If you’re over 50, chances are the obligatory world maps hanging in your classrooms were based on the Mercator projection. You probably remember it: Greenland, which is 14 times smaller than Africa, appears to be the same size as the continent. And Europe looks twice as large as South America, instead of half the size, as it really is.

Dutchman Gerard Mercator, as smart a businessman as he was a mapmaker, would have been appalled if he knew his map projection was used to educate children in geography, since it was never intended as anything like an accurate depiction of the globe.

The English title of his 1569 map (the first world map to use what we now call the Mercator projection) is “A New and Enlarged Description of the Earth with Corrections for Use in Navigation.”   Continue reading

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