Category Archives: Governance

The El Dorado Complex in the Shaping of Indo-Guyanese – Clem Seecharan

           THE 2014 REPUBLIC OF GUYANA DISTINGUISHED                    LECTURE     

                The El Dorado Complex in the Shaping of Indo-Guyanese: A                                                       Revisionist Perspective

                                          by  CLEM SEECHARAN

Emeritus Professor of History,  London Metropolitan University

In February 1594 Sir Robert Dudley made inquiries about the rumoured Empire of Guiana…He sent a small boat to investigate and its crew returned, after great hardships, to say that the natives had told them of goldmines so rich that the people of the country powdered themselves with gold-dust.   Michael Swan (1957)

Guyana has alwaysbeen a land of fantasy. It was the land of El Dorado….  V.S. Naipaul (1991)     

 Guyana, for all its independence and its symbols of nationhood, has never been a closely-knit society…the ethnic divide made this almost impossible. There is hatred between the various ethnic groups with the darkest of the races being reserved for the greatest hatred.      Leader, Kaieteur News, 6 February 2014   Continue reading

Bartica must become a town- APNU

Bartica must become a town- APNU

Monday, 31 March 2014 –  Demerara Waves

David Granger

APNU Chairman David Granger

The opposition A Partnership for National Unity (APNU) has promised to push for Bartica to be designated a town and for a number of ills like poor waste disposal to be addressed.

Already, the area is often described as a gold mining township where business has been booming largely due to a spike in the price for the precious yellow metal.

APNU Chairman, David Granger told residents of Bartica and several areas at a town hall meeting at the St. John’s Anglican School that his coalition would like to see that community become Guyana’s seventh town.
Authorities have also identified the need for Lethem near the Guyana-Brazil border to be designated a town. The other towns are Georgetown, Linden, New Amsterdam, Rose Hall, Corriverton and Anna Regina.  

Continue reading

Jimmy Carter’s new book ‘A Call to Action’ receives positive reviews

Jimmy Carter’s new book ‘A Call to Action’ receives positive reviews

In Carter’s new book, he says that he believes the biggest challenge facing our world today is the subjugation and abuse of women and girls.

By Husna Haq / March 26, 2014

Jimmy Carter’s new book is titled ‘A Call to Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power.’

Bebeto Matthews/AP – Christian Science Monitor

It is a crisis that manifests itself across the world in the form of child marriage, unequal pay, female genital mutilation, human trafficking, and more. It is the most serious challenge facing our world today: the subjugation and abuse of women and girls.   Continue reading

Race, ethnic politics and police violence in Guyana – By David Hinds

Commentary: Race, ethnic politics and police violence in Guyana
Published on March 25, 2014 - By Dr David Hinds
There is major concern over police brutality against African Guyanese since the current executive government came to power. African Guyanese activists have pointed to over 400 African Guyanese, mostly young men, who have died at the hands of the police since 1992. There are strong claims that there was direct state involvement in some of these killings during the period 2002-2006. The recent Colwyn Harding incident has raised these concerns anew. Many have joined the debate. There have been some very useful contributions. The police force has correctly come under severe criticisms. But, sadly, what is missing from the debate is how police brutality is a reflection of our larger ethno-racial problem. Of all the public commentators, only Henry Jeffery and Freddy Kissoon have dared to go there.

davidhinds.jpg
Dr David Hinds is a political activist and commentator. He is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Caribbean and African Diaspora Studies in the School of Social Transformation at Arizona State University. 

And yes, we have had and will continue to have an ethno-racial problem. I use the term ethno-racial to mean ethnic groups that relate to each other through the lens of race. To get a proper sense of what we are talking about, a brief history and explanation of race is needed. We often talk about race in Guyana as if it is figment of people’s imagination — false consciousness. But it is not; it is real. Race as biology has been proven to be unreal. But race as social, political, economic and cultural practice is real.

The concept of race was first developed in the USA in the late 1600s as a justification for the rise of plantation slavery. It gave social meaning to skin colour. Blackness came to mean less than human, while whiteness came to mean fully human. The German philosopher, Hegel, said to be human is to be white. Thomas Jefferson would later remark that blacks were inferior in body and mind and do not feel life’s pains as other groups. Other white thinkers concluded that black people could not exist in a state of freedom. Hence it would be dangerous to free them from slavery.Blackness became synonymous with, among other things, backwardness, indolence, shallowness, unreason and laziness. This characterization of blackness as inferior — the white racial frame — found its way into laws and socio-economic and political policies. Over time such laws and polices inevitably begun to shape people’s consciousness about blackness and, by extension, whiteness.

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The real meaning of the protests in Venezuela – Commentary

Commentary: The real meaning of the protests in Venezuela
Published on March 21, 2014 – Caribbean News Now
By Jose GomezIt is obvious to keen observers that a coup d’état is being attempted in Venezuela,The tactics are inspired by the “Gene Sharp” protocol. Sharp is a former US military officer, now professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts and author of an essay entitled ‘From Dictatorship to Democracy’. The essay provides a political framework as a method to undermine the stability of an established government that is regarded as ‘not friendly’ to the United States.

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Jose Gomez is Venezuela’s ambassador to Barbados

The book, translated into more than 30 languages, describes methods to overthrow governments, divided into three major phases: protest, non-cooperation and intervention. It is these methods that are being employed by the opposition in Venezuela following the outcome of the presidential election of April 14, 2013, in which they were defeated by Nicolas Maduro. The methods are:

Softening: the development of media priming and agenda setting in national and international public opinion focused on actual or potential deficits; thrust of conflict and promotion of discontent”. The media is overwhelmingly in the hands of the opposition.   Continue reading

Former Jamaica finance minister wants fixed exchange rate

Former Jamaica finance minister wants fixed exchange rate

Audley Shaw
Since March 2013, the Jamaica dollar has lost 12.2 percent of its value, moving from Jamaica $97.34 to US$1 to Jamaica $109.02 to US$1.

KINGSTON, Jamaica, Tuesday March 18, 2014, CMC – The Opposition Jamaica Labour Party’s (JLP) spokesman on Finance Audley Shaw has called on the government to fix the exchange rate in the interest of economic stability.

Shaw, in a presentation at the University of the West Indies (UWI) Mona Campus on Thursday, said calls for a competitive exchange rate are nothing more than a euphemism for further devaluation which he points out has brought little gain so far.

“Are we seeing more exports as a result? No, in fact exports are down, not up. That is supposed to be one of the benefits of devaluation.  Shouldn’t we then be fighting to maintain a stable or fixed exchange rate because the bigger negative impact is on our debt? It is time for us to start asking where is the positive impact of this continued devaluation of the Jamaican dollar, if all we have are negatives, then I suggest that we need to look at fixing the exchange rate, even for a period of time.”   Continue reading

VICTIM INVESTOR GUYANA – official video by the investor

VICTIM INVESTOR GUYANA (Official)

Published on Feb 17, 2014 - The Devastating Experiences of a Brazilian Investor in Guyana – Painful reality of a country through the eyes of a foreign investor.

Comment from viewer Continue reading

Ukraine: One “Regime Change” Too Many? – commentary

Ukraine: One “Regime Change” Too Many?
Monday, 03 March 2014 – By Ray McGovern, Consortium News | News Analysis

Unidentified troops march as they block a military base in the village of Privolnoye in the Crimea region of Ukraine, March 2, 2014. Russia’s move to seize the Crimean Peninsula brought a warning from Ukraine against further incursions. Ukraine’s premier said on Sunday that the nation was on the “brink of disaster.” (Photo: Sergey Ponomarev / The New York Times)

Unidentified troops march as they block a military base in the village of Privolnoye in the Crimea region of Ukraine, March 2, 2014. Russia’s move to seize the Crimean Peninsula brought a warning from Ukraine against further incursions. Ukraine’s premier said on Sunday that the nation was on the “brink of disaster.” (Photo: Sergey Ponomarev / The New York Times)

Is “regime change” in Ukraine the bridge too far for the neoconservative “regime changers” of Official Washington and their sophomoric “responsibility-to-protect” (R2P) allies in the Obama administration? Have they dangerously over-reached by pushing the putsch that removed duly-elected Ukrainian President Viktor Yanukovych?   Continue reading

Africa Rising – New realities in business & development – 2 videos

The image of a dark Africa is going to change radically in the coming years.

The image of a dark Africa is going to change radically in the coming years.

Here are two TED presentations that give an updated analysis of the economic changes  now taking place on that continent, the home of many nations and cultures.    Continue reading

Why So Much Anarchy? – By Robert D. Kaplan – commentary

Why So Much Anarchy?

Ukraine protests -2014

Ukraine protests -2014

By Robert D. Kaplan  - STRATFOR

Twenty years ago, in February 1994, I published a lengthy cover story in The Atlantic Monthly, “The Coming Anarchy: How Scarcity, Crime, Overpopulation, Tribalism, and Disease are Rapidly Destroying the Social Fabric of Our Planet.”

I argued that the combination of resource depletion (like water), demographic youth bulges and the proliferation of shanty towns throughout the developing world would enflame ethnic and sectarian divides, creating the conditions for domestic political breakdown and the transformation of war into increasingly irregular forms — making it often indistinguishable from terrorism.   Continue reading

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