Category Archives: History

Henry S. Fraser: Letter from Britain – Part 2 – Heritage Tourism

Henry S. Fraser: Letter from Britain – Part 2

“When a man is tired of London he is tired of life.” (Samuel Johnson)

”Without my past I have no memories. Without history I have no roots. “(Jennifer Renton)

“72% of tourists from Russia and 66% of those from China say that castles, churches, monuments and historic houses are top of their list of things to visit in Britain.” (From Valuing our Heritage, English Heritage and National Trust publication)

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, Sunday October 5, 2014 - Heritage tourism is by far the fastest growing aspect of tourism worldwide. There has always been a magical attraction to the antiquities of Greece, Rome and Egypt, for centuries the preserve of the wealthy English and Western Europeans on their “grand tours”, and then popularised for the middle classes by Thomas Cook and the railways in the late 19th century. But today the world’s travellers are seeking heritage attractions everywhere. For older people beaches are boring, and the search is on for cultural heritage.

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Little Guyana, an Indo-Guyanese enclave in Queens

Little Guyana, an Indo-Guyanese enclave in Queens

October 9, 2014 – Washington Post

Nobody told me about Little Guyana, a mile-plus-long stretch in the Richmond Hill neighborhood of Queens where the residents are Indian but sound like Bob Marley when they speak.

I discovered it by accident when I fell asleep on the A train, passed up my intended destination and was awakened by a fellow passenger telling me that the train had reached its last stop. The people here, known as Indo-Guyanese, are mainly descendants of indentured servants who were recruited from India (often by deceptive tactics) to work on the sugar plantations of present-day Guyana — formerly known as British Guiana — starting in 1838, when the British abolished black slavery in their colonies.   Continue reading

Turkey, the Kurds and Iraq: The Prize and Peril of Kirkuk

Turkey, the Kurds and Iraq: The Prize and Peril of Kirkuk

Geopolitical Weekly  Tuesday, October 7, 2014 -

In June 1919, aboard an Allied warship en route to Paris, sat Damat Ferid Pasha, the Grand Vizier of a crumbling Ottoman Empire. The elderly statesman, donning an iconic red fez and boasting an impeccably groomed mustache, held in his hands a memorandum that he was to present to the Allied powers at the Quai d’Orsay. The negotiations on postwar reparations started five months earlier, but the Ottoman delegation was prepared to make the most of its tardy invitation to the talks. As he journeyed across the Mediterranean that summer toward the French shore, Damat Ferid mentally rehearsed the list of demands he would make to the Allied powers during his last-ditch effort to hold the empire together.

He began with a message, not of reproach, but of inculpability: “Gentlemen, I should not be bold enough to come before this High Assembly if I thought that the Ottoman people had incurred any responsibility in the war that has ravaged Europe and Asia with fire and sword.” His speech was followed by an even more defiant memorandum, denouncing any attempt to redistribute Ottoman land to the Kurds, Greeks and Armenians, asserting: “In Asia, the Turkish lands are bounded on the south by the provinces of Mosul and Diyarbakir, as well as a part of Aleppo as far as the Mediterranean.” When Damat Ferid’s demands were presented in Paris, the Allies were in awe of the gall displayed by the Ottoman delegation. Continue reading

Indian prime minister to visit Guyana and Suriname

Indian prime minister to visit Guyana and Suriname
By Ray Chickrie-  Caribbean News Now contributor – October 7, 2014

India's P.M. Narendra Modi

India’s P.M. Narendra Modi

GEORGETOWN, Guyana — Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will visit Guyana and Suriname early next year. Since Indira Gandhi’s visit to Guyana in 1968, to seek support against Pakistan, no other Indian prime minister has visited Guyana. And it will be the first ever visit to Suriname by an Indian leader.

Hindustanis make up large chunks of the populations in Guyana, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. They begin arriving as indentured workers in Guyana in 1838 and in Suriname in 1873, mainly from the northern Indian states of Uttar Pradesh and Bihar, and comprised about 80 percent Hindus and 20 percent Muslims.  Continue reading

The Diaspora is a diminishing Phenomenon – By Hubert Williams

THE DIASPORA IS A DIMINISHING PHENOMENON

    By Hubert Williams

Boston, Massachusetts — Nostalgia is a constant repetition of a lived experience; so few children based outside of their parents’ home country and who have not really shared their parents’ past should be expected to feel as fervently as their parents do about the “homeland”… so, with each succeeding generation, I expect that the fervour about “our home” will be increasingly depleted, as will the flow of “remittances”, barrels and sundry packages which have helped considerably to sustain relatives during those parlous times in Guyana approaching the end of the last century… and even up to now.

What applies to Guyana is as well the experience of Barbados and other Commonwealth Caribbean countries where the human flow outwards followed Independence, burgeoning economic stringencies and social challenges – not the least of them being corruption, crime and violence.  Continue reading

Henry S. Fraser: Letter from Britain – Part 1

British mail box in the countryside

Henry S. Fraser: Letter from Britain – Part 1

“Our tolerance is part of what makes Britain Britain. So conform to it, or don’t come here.”
(Tony Blair)

“It has something to do with being British – we don’t take ourselves as seriously as other countries do.” (Joan Collins)

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GCA September 2014 Magazine – featuring Folk Festival 2014

Click to enlarge

Click to enlarge

 

GCA September 2014 Magazine

IN THIS ISSUE
PAGE 3-17: Folk Festival Season editorial & in pictures
PAGE 18-19: Commentary from Dhanpaul Narine
PAGE 20-24: Amerindian Heritage Month
PAGE 25-26: A call to action
PAGE 27-30: Convocation-Institute of Creative Arts
PAGE 31: St. Gabriels International Day 2014

September Editor: Lear Matthews

SAD OLD HOUSE – By Dmitri Allicock

Sad Old House

SAD OLD HOUSE

By Dmitri Allicock

Abandoned house sits beneath a breadfruit
Broken down entwined memories of roots
Rusting roof, faded paint and wood rotten
Empty of happier days that’s now forgotten
Yard overgrown with trees and vine

Read more — Go to the Dmitri Allicock Blog to comment and share

Rohee’s threat against Granger and APNU must not be taken lightly by Prof. David Hinds

Rohee’s threat against Granger and APNU must not be taken lightly by Prof. David Hinds

Dr. David Hinds

Dr. David Hinds

24 September 2014 – Demerara Waves

There comes a time when a nation must sit up and take note of where it is and do something to halt its deterioration. Sometimes a nation get so tired of being abused, terrorized and pulverized by its government that it takes such a situation for granted. Government bullying becomes normative. We may be almost there in Guyana, but it’s not too late to do something about it. Take the following statement from a high government functionary that appeared in one of the daily newspapers.

“If Mr. Granger thinks I am weak…You know, he has launched a countrywide protest exercise to hasten the government’s’ signature on a number of Bills. I would like Mr. Granger to know… and I am not threatening or warning anybody. I am just saying that he announced that these things will be peaceful and so forth. If they are not peaceful and should there be any diversions from the peacefulness of any of those protest activities organized by Mr. Granger resulting in upsetting of the peace and good order of our country, then he will see who is really too weak to fight.”  Continue reading

Guyana, Cheddi Jagan & the Cold War – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Originally posted on Three Worlds One Vision:

Cheddi and Janet Jagan - Wedding Photo - Chicago USA 1943Cheddi and Janet Jagan – Wedding Photo – Chicago/USA – 1943
Photo Credit: Cheddi Jagan Research Centre

On Saturday, at the People’s Climate Los Angeles – Building Blocks against Climate Change, I had the opportunity to chat with the leader of the small contingent from the Communist Party USA. I learned that he had visited Guyana in 1967.

In the 1960s, in what was then British Guiana, the Catholic Church had drilled the fear of communism into my young impressionable mind. Those were the days of the Cold War. With their dread of the Soviet Union and fear of another Cuba in their backyard, the US government covertly ousted from power Guyana’s populist East Indian leader, the Marxist Cheddi Jagan.

“I met Cheddi Jagan and his wife, Janet,” the white American male said with pride.

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