Category Archives: Technology

The DC-3 The Plane That Changed The World + early aviation in Guyana

The DC-3 The Plane That Changed The World

The DC-3 was designed in the early 1930′s.  It first flew on December 17, 1935, which means in about a year it will be turning 80! I don’t think these aircraft will ever disappear from the skies as thousands were manufactured and at least 1,000 are still in service, refurbished and updated .  The low initial cost of these planes and their capabilities make economic sense for many small arlines ferryinng passengers and cargo.

British Guiana Airways (Guyana Airways) had DC3′s (also called Dakotas) in its fleet, serving regionally as well as the locally, mainly on the Georgetown – Lethem, Rupununi route.  See following picture and  link on the history of early aviation in Guyana: Continue reading

Smart kids’ life advice – Playlist (7 video talks)

Playlist (7 talks)

Smart kids’ life advice

These young speakers encourage us to ask bold questions, think creatively and dream big. It’s spot-on life advice that adults may just want to listen to.

Playlist (7 talks): Smart kids’ life advice

  • 8:12

    Child prodigy Adora Svitak says the world needs “childish” thinking: bold ideas, wild creativity and especially optimism. Kids’ big dreams deserve high expectations, she says, starting with grownups’ willingness to learn from children as much as to teach.

SHADOWS OF ALUMINA – By Dmitri Allicock

Alumina plant

SHADOWS OF ALUMINA

By Dmitri Allicock

Silhouette of the Alumina Plant ghostly glow

Where shadows of thousands once flow

Graveyard since 1982, absent toiling horde

Encroaching jungle reclaims without a word

British Guiana’s largest investment of 1961

Processing Alumina by the thousands of tons

Read more: Go to the Dmitri Allicock blog to comment and share

Modern Alphabet taught to kids nowadays – suggestion

New Alphabet

Click picture to enlarge

Experts Warn of ‘Inevitable’ Fukushima Disaster in California – commentary

Experts Warn of ‘Inevitable’ Fukushima Disaster in California 

ANTHONY GUCCIARDI
NATURAL SOCIETY / Nation of Change - Wednesday 3 September 2014
 
A ‘new Fukushima’ nuclear power plant is located in California right on nearby faults that have actually been found to be more dangerous than previously thought. There is no telling how much of a lethal blow would be dealt to humanity if this nuclear plant follows in Fukushima’s nuclear plants’ footsteps.

FukushimaSince the catastrophic meltdown of the Fukushima nuclear power plant in March of 2011 irreparably altered the state of the planet for the known future, the incident has been shrouded in nothing but bureaucratic cover ups and government-backed disinformation. Now, within our own borders, top experts turned whistleblowers are warning of a nuclear nightmare that could surpass Fukushima and Chernobyl alike by leaps and bounds.  Continue reading

Can we prevent the end of the world? – by Martin Rees, Astrophysicist

Can we prevent the end of the world? Martin Rees Astrophysicist

Martin Rees Astrophysicist
Lord Martin Rees, one of the world’s most eminent astronomers, is an emeritus professor of cosmology and astrophysics at the University of Cambridge and the UK’s Astronomer Royal. He is one of our key thinkers on the future of humanity in the cosmos. Full bio

A post-apocalyptic Earth, emptied of humans, seems like the stuff of science fiction TV and movies. But in this short, surprising talk, Lord Martin Rees asks us to think about our real existential risks — natural and human-made threats that could wipe out humanity. As a concerned member of the human race, he asks: What’s the worst thing that could possibly happen?  View video below: Continue reading

What kind of web do we want? – by Sir Tim Berners-Lee – video

What kind of web do we want? – by Sir Tim Berners-Lee – video

Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness.

View Video below:

What can USA and British education systems learn from classrooms in the developing world?

What can the American and British education systems learn from classrooms in the developing world? inc videos

Posted by: Kate Torgovnick May August 14, 2014 at 10:59 am EDT
A group of students in Karakati, India, research the answer to a big question at one location of Sugata Mitra's School in the Cloud. According to Mitra and Adam Braun, there's a lot that Western schools can learn about education from students in India.

Students in Phaltan, India, research the answer to a big question at one of Sugata Mitra’s School in the Cloud labs. According to Mitra and his Microsoft Work Wonders Project partner, Adam Braun, there’s quite a bit that Western schools can learn from classrooms in the developing world.

Adam Braun went to school in the US and now runs a nonprofit that builds schools in Ghana, Laos, Nicaragua and Guatemala. In contrast, Sugata Mitra—the winner of the 2013 TED Prize—went to school in India and now is a professor in the UK, where his research on self-directed learning routinely brings him into elementary schools.
Both of these education activists have seen how typical classrooms function in the Western world, and both have seen how typical classrooms function in the developing world. And both say, the West isn’t always better.Braun and Mitra have teamed up through Microsoft’s Work Wonders Project to bring Mitra’s School in the Cloud learning platform into Braun’s Pencils of Promise schools. As the two pilot their partnership in a school in rural Ghana, we got them together via Skype to talk through a bold question: what can the West learn from the developing world when it comes to education? Their conversation is packed with insights.   Continue reading

Hidden miracles of the natural world – Louie Schwartzberg – TED video

Louie Schwartzberg: Hidden miracles of the natural world

Published on Apr 9, 2014 - We live in a world of unseeable beauty, so subtle and delicate that it is imperceptible to the human eye. To bring this invisible world to light, filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg bends the boundaries of time and space with high-speed cameras, time lapses and microscopes.

At TED2014, he shares highlights from his latest project, a 3D film titled “Mysteries of the Unseen World,” which slows down, speeds up, and magnifies the astonishing wonders of nature.

Ten Things That Will Disappear In Our Lifetime

Many things have already disappeared in our lifetime… here are others:

Ten Things That Will Disappear In Our Lifetime

This article is  USA oriented, but Canada & the rest will not be  far behind.   Whether these changes are good or bad depends in part on how we adapt to them.  But, ready or not, here they come.

1. The Post Office
Get ready to imagine a world without the post office. They are so deeply in financial trouble that there is probably no way to sustain it long term. Email, Fed Ex, and UPS have just about wiped out the minimum revenue needed to keep the post office alive. Most of your mail every day is junk mail and bills.

2. The Check 
Britain is already laying the groundwork to do away with check by 2018.  It costs the financial system billions of dollars a year to process checks.  Plastic cards and online transactions will lead to the eventual demise of the check.  This plays right into the death of the post office.  If you never paid your bills by mail and never received them by mail, the post office would absolutely go out of business.   Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,926 other followers

%d bloggers like this: