Category Archives: Technology

Can we prevent the end of the world? – by Martin Rees, Astrophysicist

Can we prevent the end of the world? Martin Rees Astrophysicist

Martin Rees Astrophysicist
Lord Martin Rees, one of the world’s most eminent astronomers, is an emeritus professor of cosmology and astrophysics at the University of Cambridge and the UK’s Astronomer Royal. He is one of our key thinkers on the future of humanity in the cosmos. Full bio

A post-apocalyptic Earth, emptied of humans, seems like the stuff of science fiction TV and movies. But in this short, surprising talk, Lord Martin Rees asks us to think about our real existential risks — natural and human-made threats that could wipe out humanity. As a concerned member of the human race, he asks: What’s the worst thing that could possibly happen?  View video below: Continue reading

What kind of web do we want? – by Sir Tim Berners-Lee – video

What kind of web do we want? – by Sir Tim Berners-Lee – video

Sir Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web 25 years ago. So it’s worth a listen when he warns us: There’s a battle ahead. Eroding net neutrality, filter bubbles and centralizing corporate control all threaten the web’s wide-open spaces. It’s up to users to fight for the right to access and openness.

View Video below:

What can USA and British education systems learn from classrooms in the developing world?

What can the American and British education systems learn from classrooms in the developing world? inc videos

Posted by: Kate Torgovnick May August 14, 2014 at 10:59 am EDT
A group of students in Karakati, India, research the answer to a big question at one location of Sugata Mitra's School in the Cloud. According to Mitra and Adam Braun, there's a lot that Western schools can learn about education from students in India.

Students in Phaltan, India, research the answer to a big question at one of Sugata Mitra’s School in the Cloud labs. According to Mitra and his Microsoft Work Wonders Project partner, Adam Braun, there’s quite a bit that Western schools can learn from classrooms in the developing world.

Adam Braun went to school in the US and now runs a nonprofit that builds schools in Ghana, Laos, Nicaragua and Guatemala. In contrast, Sugata Mitra—the winner of the 2013 TED Prize—went to school in India and now is a professor in the UK, where his research on self-directed learning routinely brings him into elementary schools.
Both of these education activists have seen how typical classrooms function in the Western world, and both have seen how typical classrooms function in the developing world. And both say, the West isn’t always better.Braun and Mitra have teamed up through Microsoft’s Work Wonders Project to bring Mitra’s School in the Cloud learning platform into Braun’s Pencils of Promise schools. As the two pilot their partnership in a school in rural Ghana, we got them together via Skype to talk through a bold question: what can the West learn from the developing world when it comes to education? Their conversation is packed with insights.   Continue reading

Hidden miracles of the natural world – Louie Schwartzberg – TED video

Louie Schwartzberg: Hidden miracles of the natural world

Published on Apr 9, 2014 - We live in a world of unseeable beauty, so subtle and delicate that it is imperceptible to the human eye. To bring this invisible world to light, filmmaker Louie Schwartzberg bends the boundaries of time and space with high-speed cameras, time lapses and microscopes.

At TED2014, he shares highlights from his latest project, a 3D film titled “Mysteries of the Unseen World,” which slows down, speeds up, and magnifies the astonishing wonders of nature.

Ten Things That Will Disappear In Our Lifetime

Many things have already disappeared in our lifetime… here are others:

Ten Things That Will Disappear In Our Lifetime

This article is  USA oriented, but Canada & the rest will not be  far behind.   Whether these changes are good or bad depends in part on how we adapt to them.  But, ready or not, here they come.

1. The Post Office
Get ready to imagine a world without the post office. They are so deeply in financial trouble that there is probably no way to sustain it long term. Email, Fed Ex, and UPS have just about wiped out the minimum revenue needed to keep the post office alive. Most of your mail every day is junk mail and bills.

2. The Check 
Britain is already laying the groundwork to do away with check by 2018.  It costs the financial system billions of dollars a year to process checks.  Plastic cards and online transactions will lead to the eventual demise of the check.  This plays right into the death of the post office.  If you never paid your bills by mail and never received them by mail, the post office would absolutely go out of business.   Continue reading

Guyana’s young people are largely forgotten

Young people are largely forgotten

JULY 8, 2014 | BY  | EDITORIAL

Half of Guyana’s population (about 50.9 per cent) is below the age of 24. And more than one-third (about 36.9 per cent) is between 25 and 54 years of age. The government, however, persists in the non-implementation of a coherent national policy to cater to the needs of this large number of young Guyanese.

Young people are the nation’s future but they face monumental challenges. The spate of suicides among adolescents, the rising number of teenage pregnancies, the large number of school dropouts, the unavailability of new job opportunities, the reports of their being victims of police brutality and torture, the huge prison population (of which youth are said to comprise 75 per cent) and the predicament of juveniles in the New Opportunity Corps are all signs of a dangerous and deteriorating social situation. Continue reading

Tribute to Mr Cecil Carl Cunha, M.S. – by Maj. Gen. (Retd) Joseph G. Singh, MSS

Tribute to Mr Cecil Carl Cunha, M.S. (1914-06-25 – 2014-06-20)

By Major General (retd) Joseph G Singh, MSS  …on Thursday, 2014-06-26,

at the St Andrew’s Presbyterian Church

Cecil Cunha at 99

Hon Prime Minister, Leader of the Opposition, Your Worship the Mayor, Lynette, Heuvel, other relatives and friends of the deceased, I thank Lynette and her family for inviting me to deliver this short Tribute to a Dear Friend, whom I have known for over forty years.

Born on June 25, 1914, Cecil Carl Cunha, M.S. transitioned last Friday, five days before his 100th birthday. Exactly 10 years ago (June 2004), I published a book titled: The Mataruki Trail, which is a record of the work of the Boundary Commission that established the Tri-Junction Point at the head of the east Kutari River, which the joint survey team of the British, Brazilians and Dutch in 1937, verified through detailed on the ground surveys, was the source of the Corentyne River – the border with Suriname. Continue reading

Space Station Commander Provides Tour of Orbital Laboratory

Space Station Commander Provides Tour of Orbital Laboratory

THIS IS AMAZING— Some have no idea as to what the Space Station interior looks like. This is very impressive.  Something worthwhile watching.

Published on Nov 19, 2012 – In her final days as Commander of the International Space Station, Sunita Williams of NASA recorded an extensive tour of the orbital laboratory and downlinked the video on Nov. 18, 2012.  Continue reading

Australia pioneers renewable power – video

Australia pioneers renewable power – video

Published on Apr 12, 2014 – Engineers on a small Australian island are claiming to have perfected renewable energy supply for sustained periods. At times, all of King island is powered by renewable energy, meeting the needs of its 2,000 inhabitants. Despite using diesel, it is hoped it will make renewable energy a viable option for other small communities around the world. ….Al Jazeera’s Andrew Thomas reports from King island, Australia.

Half-century milestone for IBM mainframes

Half-century milestone for IBM mainframes

IBM S360 mainframeMainframes were the workhorses of business for many years
The IBM mainframe is celebrating its 50th anniversary.  The first System 360 mainframe was unveiled on 7 April 1964 and its arrival marked a break with all general purpose computers that came before.

The machines made it possible to upgrade the processors but still keep using the same code and peripherals from earlier models. Later this year the British rival to IBM’s machine, the ICL 1900, also celebrates its 50th anniversary. Despite their age, mainframes are still in wide use now, said Barry Heptonstall, a spokesman for IBM.  “I don’t think people realise how often during the day they interact with a mainframe,” he said.  Continue reading

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