Tag Archives: Kenya

Tartan: Its Journey Through the African Diaspora’

CIAD presents ‘Tartan: Its Journey Through the African Diaspora’

By ARC Magazine Sunday, August 3rd, 2014

 The Costume Institute of the African Diaspora (CIAD) presents its first major project titled ‘Tartan: Its Journey through the African Diaspora’, which tells the story of how tartan travelled around the world and through its influence led to aspects of material culture being developed  in certain parts of Africa and the Diaspora. The project looks at how these cultures adapted, adopted or absorbed this influence to bring significance to fabrics such as madras cloth. Madras cloth was created in India and then sold to people in the Caribbean, the fabric has been used in the development of many islands national dress.

Africa: Beware of China’s $$$ – NYT commentary

Beware of China’s $$$ – NYT commentary

MAY 23, 2014 | BY  | By Howard W. French
Africa: political map

Africa: political map

“The problem (though not limited to China) is relying on shady arrangements made at the very top of the political system, often in the president’s office itself. Contracts are greased with monetary bribes and other enticements like expense-paid shopping trips to China and scholarships there for elite children.”

(Taken from the New York Times)

NAIROBI, Kenya — For nearly a decade, as China made a historic push for business opportunities and expanded influence in Africa, most of the continent’s leaders were so thrilled at having a deep-pocketed partner willing to make big investments and start huge new projects that they rarely paused to consider whether they were getting a sound deal.     Continue reading

BBC Future of Food – Part 2: Senegal

BBC Future of Food – Part 2: Senegal

Uploaded on Feb 27, 2012 – 

Future of Food – Part 2 of 3 documentaries

George heads out to India to discover how a changing diet in the developing world is putting pressure on the world’s limited food resources. He finds out how using crops to produce fuel is impacting on food supplies across the continents. George then meets a farmer in Kent, who is struggling to sell his fruit at a profit, and a British farmer in Kenya who is shipping out tones of vegetables for our supermarket shelves. He also examines why so many people are still dying of hunger after decades of food aid.           Continue reading

Dark Hearts – the truth of British colonial history

Dark Hearts – the truth of British colonial history

We British have a peculiar ability to blot out our colonial history.

By George Monbiot, published in the Guardian 24th April 2012

There is one thing you can say for the Holocaust deniers: at least they know what they are denying. In order to sustain the lies they tell, they must engage in strenuous falsification. To dismiss Britain’s colonial atrocities, no such effort is required. Most people appear to be unaware that anything needs to be denied.

The story of benign imperialism, whose overriding purpose was not to seize land, labour and commodities but to teach the natives English, table manners and double-entry book-keeping, is a myth that has been carefully propagated by the right-wing press. But it draws its power from a remarkable national ability to airbrush and disregard our past.

Last week’s revelations, that the British government systematically destroyed the documents detailing mistreatment of its colonial subjects(1), and that the Foreign Office then lied about a secret cache of files containing lesser revelations(2), is by any standards a big story. But it was either ignored or consigned to a footnote by most of the British press.       [ - more - Dark Hearts]

Diwali Celebrations Around the World

Diwali Celebrations Around the World- By Dr. Latchman P Kissoon

Dr. Latchman Kissoon

The festival of Diwali has been celebrated for ages and grows in attraction by the year. Diwali means a row or cluster of lights which symbolizes Light over Darkness, Knowledge over Ignorance, Good over Evil and Love over Hate.

Diwali falls on the lunar month of Kartik meaning the month of Ocotober or November on the darkest night of the Hindu lunar year.   This year the festival is celebrated on Friday day 5th day of   November 2010. This is an occasion for the young and the old, men and women, rich and poor – for everyone irrespective of their religious and economic background who seeks light, knowledge and love.

The festival is celebrated throughout the world to ward off the darkness and welcome the light into our lives and as William Shakespeare said “see yea that light yonder so shines a good deed in a naughty world”. This festival is celebrated on a grand scale in almost all the regions of India and is looked upon mainly as the beginning of New Year. As such the blessings of Lakshmi, the celestial consort of Lord Vishnu is invoked with prayers.

Diwali is also celebrated outside India mainly in Australia, Barbados, Britain, Canada, Guyana, Indonesia, Japan, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda, Malaysia, Mauritius, Myanmar (Burma), Nepal, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Suriname, Thailand, Trinidad and Tobago and the United States of America among the Hindus world over. Places as far as Southern America have record of celebrating Diwali.  Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,827 other followers

%d bloggers like this: