Exxon-Mobil discovers more oil in offshore Guyana

Photo: ExxonMobil at work in the Liz-1 well in the Stabroek Block  exxon-well

— ExxonMobil announces positive results from Payara-1 well

Guyana Chronicle – January 13, 2017

EXXONMOBIL has announced positive results from its Payara-1 well offshore Guyana. Payara is ExxonMobil’s second oil discovery on the Stabroek Block and was drilled in a new reservoir. The Payara-1 well targeted similar aged reservoirs that were proven successful at the company’s Liza discovery.“This important discovery further establishes the area as a significant exploration province,” said Steve Greenlee, president of ExxonMobil Exploration Company.
“We look forward to working with the Government and our co-venturers to continue evaluating broader exploration potential on the block and the greater Liza area.”   

The well was drilled by ExxonMobil affiliate Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited, and encountered more than 95 feet (29 meters) of high-quality, oil-bearing sandstone reservoirs.

It was safely drilled to 18,080 feet (5,512 meters) in 6,660 feet (2,030 meters) of water. The Payara field discovery is about 10 miles (16 km) northwest of the 2015 Liza discovery.

In addition to the Payara discovery, appraisal drilling at Liza-3 has identified an additional high quality, deeper reservoir directly below the Liza field, which is estimated to contain between 100-150 million oil equivalent barrels.

This additional resource is currently being evaluated for development in conjunction with the world-class Liza discovery.

“These latest exploration successes are examples of ExxonMobil’s technological capabilities in ultra-deepwater environments, which will enable effective development of the resource for the benefit of the people of Guyana and our shareholders,” Greenlee said.

Drilling on Payara began on November 12, with initial total depth reached on December 2. Two sidetracks have been drilled to rapidly evaluate the discovery, and a well test is underway to further evaluate the successful well results.

The well data will be analysed in the coming months to better determine the full resource potential.

The Stabroek Block is 6.6 million acres (26,800 square kilometers). Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited is operator and holds 45 per cent interest in the Stabroek Block. Hess Guyana Exploration Limited holds 30 per cent interest and CNOOC Nexen Petroleum Guyana Limited holds 25 per cent interest.

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  • Clyde Duncan  On January 14, 2017 at 3:33 am

    Curaçao weary as Venezuelan boat people begin to arrive

    By Adriana Baiz – Caracas Chronicles

    “The whole community can feel the effects of the problems in our neighbour country,” said the Governor of Curaçao, Mrs. Lucille George-Wout, as she opened the parliament year last year. “Our monitoring team has confirmed that almost all the arriving persons are exclusively small-time criminals, illegal job-seekers, and prostitutes.”

    The statement wasn’t well-received by Venezuelans on the island. “We feel it necessary,” a resident group said, “to express our discontent, not only for the misguided and inappropriate assertion but also for the stage on which it took place… If the government of the Kingdom of the Netherlands wants to avoid the effects of Venezuela’s conflict, we respectfully suggest that it make a pronouncement about the causes of the conflict and not only about its victims.”

    I moved to Curaçao in 2004. Already, back then, many Venezuelans couldn’t imagine the country could get any worse. Crime was rising and President Chávez was drastically toying with our constitution. Locals have always been aware of the co-dependent relationship between our two countries. “Si a Venezuela le da gripe,” one told me, “Curaçao se resfría”.

    If Venezuela gets the sniffles, Curaçao comes down with the cold.

    Today, Curaçao is a constituent country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands.
    That means The Hague handles its foreign relations, but all internal matters — including immigration policy — are decided independently on the island.

    For Curaçao, Venezuela has always been a close partner with close commercial ties. In Colonial times, when the Compañía Güipuzcoana tried to enforce a trade monopoly between Spain and the Captaincy General of Venezuela, the criollos merrily subverted it by smuggling their goods to Curaçao: Arturo Uslar Pietri wrote that elite Maracuchos were much more likely to meet elite Cumaneses in Willemstad than in Caracas. Today, many islanders describe going to Venezuela for a doctor’s appointment or to rumbear for the weekend. After all, the Venezuelan coast is just 65 km. away.

    Mary Goiri is a co-founder of Venex Curaçao, a community group for Venezuelans who live on the island. In the 28 years since she moved to the island, she’s seen the relationship between the two countries radically transformed.

    Curaçaoans simply can’t understand Venezuelan politics, she says. But then, who does, really? During the oil bonanza, islanders watched astonished as cash-flush raspacupos (currency-arbitrageur tourists) rampaged through island shops, buying anything not bolted down.

    Ten years later, the Venezuelans who come are astonished to find packages of Harina PAN on the shelves in every supermarket — at prices they can’t afford. (“Made in Colombia,” say the labels.)

    So the island has begun to tighten its immigration policies toward Venezuelans.

    The last time I flew in, this past June, I witnessed how an immigration agent returned seven Venezuelans right back home, putting them back on the same plane they’d just landed in. On flights from Curaçao to Venezuela, airlines have to set aside ten seats for passengers denied entry.

    Mrs. Ferrazzini, a Venezuelan immigration consultant in Curaçao told me Hato Airport is known for its strict admissions policies, because illegal immigration from across the region is a recurring issue. “With Venezuelans you never know: sometimes their credit cards don’t work, and often buying extra dollars in an emergency is impossible.”

    Venezuelans arriving at the island, whether legally or illegally, have unrealistic expectations about how easy it’ll be to improve their standard of living, Ferrazzini explains.

    The parallels with the Cubans who fled to Florida are obvious, and similarities do exist. In Falcón state, local fisherman charge anywhere from $200 to $400 per person for a trip to the island on a peñero — a small shipping vessel. Others fly in as tourists and stay looking for work without a permit.

    Local authorities are most concerned with the increase in Venezuelan peñeros, because they bring not just people but also drugs. According to local media, those who arrive illegally work mostly in areas like cleaning and construction, or else as sex workers under often exploitative conditions. Many of these women arrive brought by human traffickers are told they’re going to be hired as bartenders.

    Mrs. Ferrazzini is careful to note that while the illegal immigration problem is very real, not all arriving Venezuelans are illegal. Many are professionals who wish to invest in Curaçao.

    This past October, the Curaçao government joined a Task Force with Aruba and Bonaire to study the impact of Venezuelan refugees on the Dutch Antilles. So far, the investigation has not yielded a public statement. Curaçao government representatives didn’t respond to my request for comment.

    All indications are that Curaçao doesn’t have the capacity to sustain a refugee crisis. However, as the situation in Europe has shown, lack of concrete information leads to misguided statements.

    So is Venezuelan migration really having such a negative impact on Curaçao, or are Venezuelans on the island the victims of prejudice?

    A bit of both, I would think.

  • Clyde Duncan  On January 14, 2017 at 3:39 am

    Rich Rostrom – comment:
    Curaçao has 155,000 people; Venezuela has 31M – 200 times as many. If 1% of the starving and desperate people of Venezuela fled to Curaçao, there would be twice as many refugees as locals. No society in history has ever sustained refugees in such numbers.

    If Venezuelans fled en masse to Curaçao, it would be the equivalent of fifty or sixty shipwrecked people all trying to get into a lifeboat for eight.

    Roy – comment:
    Rich Rostrom has stated the crux of the matter. The numbers are overwhelming. Such a refugee crisis would economically sink Curaçao in the short term and culturally profoundly change Curaçao in the long term. I find it no surprise at all that they are looking at the potential hoards of Venezuelan refugees with trepidation.

    Fernando Leanme – comment:
    They could go to Aruba and build palafitos in the ocean, right in front of the Hyatt. The waves there are pretty mild, and they could make a living fishing over by the sunken German ship. Such an offshore community would be a hell of a tourist attraction; they could even call it “Nueva Venecia”.

    Nebelwald – comment:
    Wipe the smurk off your face. You’ve had your fun!

  • guyaneseonline  On January 17, 2017 at 4:52 am

    Could Guyana End Up Among The World’s Major Oil Producers?
    CARIBBEAN360JANUARY 16, 2017

    INTERNATIONAL OIL AND GAS COMPANY EXXON MOBIL STRUCK LIQUID GOLD A SECOND TIME IN ITS EXPLORATION EFFORTS OFFSHORE GUYANA.

    GEORGETOWN, Guyana, Monday January 16, 2017 – A leading consultancy firm says Guyana is poised to join the world’s major oil producing countries on the heels of the latest oil find.

    Last Thursday, international oil and gas company Exxon Mobil struck liquid gold a second time in its exploration efforts offshore Guyana. The company said it discovered oil from its Payara -1 well on the Stabroek Block after drilling for three months.

    “It’s not often that a country goes from 0 to 60 so fast like this,” Matt Blomerth, head of Latin American Upstream Research for Wood Mackenzie, a consultancy firm, told the New York Times.

    The firm also said in a report published last Friday that “Guyana is rapidly joining the ranks of serious oil and gas players.”

    ExxonMobil is ecstatic at its latest find and was anxious to determine the volume and quality of the latest oil find.

    “This important discovery further establishes the area as a significant exploration province,” said Steve Greenlee, president of ExxonMobil Exploration Company. “We look forward to working with the government and our co-venturers to continue evaluating broader exploration potential on the block and the greater Liza area.”

    Guyana’s Minister of Natural Resources, Raphael Trotman told Demerara Waves the appraisal wells would be drilled during the first half of this year, to “tell you exactly the quality of oil and of course the quantity and how much gas is there.”

    The company has already found more than one billion barrels of oil at the Liza well. The Payara field discovery is about 10 miles northwest of the Liza oil find and is the second on the Stabroek Block.

    Exxon Mobil officials have stressed that the Liza and Payara fields are close to each other but are separate reservoirs and not connected. “We are encouraged to find a second field that tells us that Liza was not a one-hit wonder,” Alan Jeffers, an Exxon Mobil spokesman, told the New York Times.

    Appraisal drilling at Liza-3 has identified an additional high quality, deeper reservoir directly below the Liza field, which is estimated to contain between 100-150 million oil equivalent barrels

    Exploration at the Payara-1 well targeted similar aged reservoirs that were proven successful at the company’s Liza discovery.

    The Stabroek Block is 6.6 million acres (26,800 square kilometers). Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Limited is operator and holds 45 percent interest in the Stabroek Block. Hess Guyana Exploration Ltd. holds 30 percent interest and CNOOC Nexen Petroleum Guyana Limited holds 25 percent interest.

    From: http://www.caribbean360.com/business/guyana-end-among-worlds-major-oil-producers#ixzz4W0jvcXZc

  • guyaneseonline  On January 25, 2017 at 8:39 pm

    ExxonMobil considers drilling more exploration wells offshore Guyana ; to shift support from Trinidad’s energy services

    Posted by: Denis Chabrol in Business, Demerara Waves Report (C) 2017 – January 25, 2017

    Photo: ExxonMobil’s Country Manager, Jeff Simon delivering a presentation at the 2017 Trinidad and Tobago Energy Conference. That session was chaired by Nigel Hughes of the Guyana Oil and Gas Association (GOGA).

    ExxonMobil will eventually scale back hiring exploration support from Trinidad-based companies and will instead turn to a shore-base operation in Guyana for production operations, even as it eyes exploring two other potential oil reservoirs, Country Manager, Jeff Simon announced.

    Read more: http://demerarawaves.com/2017/01/25/exxonmobil-considers-drilling-more-exploration-wells-offshore-guyana-to-shift-support-from-trinidads-energy-services/

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