Here’s Everyone Who’s Immigrated to the U.S. Since 1820 – interactive map

Here’s Everyone Who’s Immigrated to the U.S. Since 1820

usa-immigration-flows

click to enlarge

May 3, 2016 – http://metrocosm.com/animated-immigration-map/

This is neat.  Also watch the lower left of the screen.                   
For the past 200 years where have all the people been coming from?                         
Notice what happens after 1970. You can stop it by clicking the “stop/start” box/arrow
on the right side of the slide.

From 1820 to 2013, 79 million people obtained lawful permanent resident status in the United States. The interactive map below visualizes all of them based on their prior country of residence. The brightness of a country corresponds to its total migration to the U.S. at the given time.      

Use the controls at the bottom to stop / resume the animation or to move back and forth in time.

Two Centuries of U.S. Immigration (1 dot = 10,000 people)

Read more…  http://metrocosm.com/animated-immigration-map/

 

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Comments

  • Clyde Duncan  On February 27, 2017 at 10:30 am

    More Mexicans Leaving Than Coming to the U.S.A.

    Net Loss of 140,000 from 2009 to 2014; Family Reunification Top Reason for Return

    by Ana Gonzalez-Barrera | Pew Research Center – Hispanic Trends

    More Mexican immigrants have returned to Mexico from the U.S.A. than have migrated here since the end of the Great Recession, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of newly available government data from both countries.

    The same data sources also show the overall flow of Mexican immigrants between the two countries is at its smallest since the 1990s, mostly due to a drop in the number of Mexican immigrants coming to the U.S.A.

    From 2009 to 2014, 1 million Mexicans and their families (including U.S.-born children) left the U.S.A. for Mexico, according to data from the 2014 Mexican National Survey of Demographic Dynamics (ENADID). U.S.A. census data for the same period show an estimated 870,000 Mexican nationals left Mexico to come to the U.S.A., a smaller number than the flow of families from the U.S.A. to Mexico.

    Measuring migration flows between Mexico and the U.S.A. is challenging because there are no official counts of how many Mexican immigrants enter and leave the U.S.A. each year.

    This report uses the best available government data from both countries to estimate the size of these flows.

    The Mexican data sources — a national household survey, and two national censuses — asked comparable questions about household members’ migration to and from Mexico over the five years previous to each survey or census date.

    In addition, estimates of Mexican migration to the U.S.A. come from U.S.A. Census Bureau data, adjusted for undercount, on the number of Mexican immigrants who live in the U.S.A.

  • Rosaliene Bacchus  On February 27, 2017 at 12:36 pm

    Fascinating!

  • Gigi  On March 3, 2017 at 8:29 pm

    “There are plenty of dark spots on United States’ history, but the role it has played as a sanctuary for troubled people across the world is a history I feel very proud to be a part of.”

    Ah yes, another exceptional American — “a sanctuary for troubled people across the world” — Pfff! May I take the liberty of enlightening your sheltered mind by informing you that America did not provide “sanctuary” out of the goodness of its heart but rather to fill a desperate shortage of human capital and a desire to exploit human capital. Perhaps, once your deconditioned brain can accept this blatant FACT, you will spare us your self-serving, self-absorbed braggardly drivel.

  • Ron Saywack  On March 4, 2017 at 7:18 am

    “Pfff! May I take the liberty of enlightening your sheltered mind by informing you that America did not provide “sanctuary” out of the goodness of its heart but rather to fill a desperate shortage of human capital and a desire to exploit human capital.”

    The above statement is unnecessarily rude and offensive.

    It is copiously devoid of substance. It may be plausible if rendered as an opinion.

    Throughout the history of the U.S.A., immigrants have fled their homelands to seek refuge in the nascent country, for various reasons.

    The Pilgrims landed at Plymouth Habour to escape religious persecution in England. The Irish escaped the Great Famine. Hungarians reached America’s shores to escape the 1956 Russian invasion and communism. Hundreds of thousands of displaced persons in Europe fled to America after WWII to find a new home. Ditto “the boat people”, albeit in smaller numbers.

    To say that America let them in purely to fill a desperate shortage of human capital (and a desire to exploit …) borders on the obscene.

  • Albert  On March 4, 2017 at 12:11 pm

    “desperate shortage of human capital”

    Gigi put it a bit crude but she has a point. West Indians are currently given visas in large numbers to that travel to the U.S. I am told after finishing school young people in Guyana race to the American Embassy. My Afro American neighbor told me we should thank the Civil Right Movement. But looking at the economic situation in the US it shows.
    Giving those 10 months visa to english speaking, easily assimilating WI migrants serve many benefitual purposes.
    It provides cheap labor to meet a growing large demand for care givers to take care of US growing elderly population. They will get no Soc. Sec. or medical benefits even though they may have paid into the system.
    The young ones are good potential military fodder if they want a fast track to citizenship. Many of my young Guyanese buddies took this route during the Vietnamese War. Have not heard from any since.
    America need young workers to pay the 6.25% of salary into the pyramid SS system.
    It seem to make good ECONOMIC sense to let some groups into the US.

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