Category Archives: Agriculture

The View from Europe: Has Caribbean sugar a future? – By David Jessop

The View from Europe: Has Caribbean sugar a future?

Published on March 6, 2017 – By David Jessop

David Jessop

David Jessop

Unless the sugar industry in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) can develop in the coming months a coordinated and concerted plan of action, it is quite possible that in a few years’ time there will be little left of an industry that, for evil and good, has played a central role in the making of the Caribbean.

This is because this year will see two tsunami-like events occur, both of which threaten the survival of the industry in its present form.     Continue reading

Earth ‘On the Edge’ as Disastrous 2016 Goes Down as Hottest Year on Record

Earth ‘On the Edge’ as Disastrous 2016 Goes Down as Hottest Year on Record

We are already seeing around the globe the impacts of a changing climate’

by Andrea Germanos, staff writer – Common Dreams – 06 January 2017

An aerial photo shows severe flooding in a residential area of Baton Rouge, La. on Aug. 15, 2016. (Photo: U.S. Coast Guard)

Earth is “on the edge.”  So declared the EU’s Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) Thursday January 5, 2017, announcing that 2016 was the warmest year on record.

The first global assessment of last year’s temperatures finds that 2016 broke the record set in 2015 by close to 0.2°C , with last year’s record having broken the record set in 2014.   Continue reading

Guyana: Proposals floated to sell off several sugar estates – talks begin

Guyana: Proposals floated to sell off several sugar estates, shed non-core operations

Proposals to sell off a number of estates of the bankrupt state-owned Guyana Sugar Corporation and shed non-core operations like drainage and health services were Saturday shared with the unions and the opposition People’s Progressive Party Civic (PPPC).       Continue reading

Agriculture, gold…and oil, elevating Guyana’s international image

Agriculture, gold…and oil, elevating Guyana’s international image

By Kiana Wilburg – Kaieteur News – December 25, 2016

The impressive performance of Guyana’s gold and agriculture sectors coupled with the highly anticipated wealth to accrue from the oil industry, have all served to boost the nation’s image on the international stage.

Under new political guidance, these sectors are poised to not only transform Guyana’s growth structure but also guarantee the improvement in the nation’s management capabilities as well as its financial stability.
Here is an in-depth look at these sectors as well as their performance in recent times.      Continue reading

Tribute to Diane McTurk, M.S. (1932-2016) – By Major General (retd) Joseph G Singh

TRIBUTE TO DIANE MCTURK, M.S. (1932-2016)

Major General (retd) Joseph G Singh

Diane McTurk

Diane McTurk – the Otter Lady

I first met Diane in the late 1960s when she came to the GDF’s Officers Club in company with some senior officials from the Sugar Producers Association with which entity she was employed as Press and Public Relations Officer. They were guests of the then Chief of Staff, Colonel Ronald Pope. She was a strikingly beautiful and highly articulate woman and she held the attention of most of the gentlemen in the Club.

My next sighting of Diane was at Karanambu Ranch in 1978 when she and her Mom Constance, met my team when we deplaned at the smaller airstrip – almost on the doorstep of the Ranch’s administrative buildings.   Continue reading

Made in Guyana – Virgin Coconut Oil – video

Made in Guyana – Virgin Coconut Oil – video

So many uses for the Coconut – by Francis Quamina Farrier

So many uses for the Coconut – by Francis Quamina Farrier

 Francis Quamina Farrier

Francis Quamina Farrier

It is safe to say that the just concluded Coconut Festival here in Guyana, was a great success. I will not be telling you about what the Powers-that-be had to say at the opening ceremony, as they made their official verbal presentations. Instead, I will tell you what I saw as an ordinary person, speaking with other ordinary citizens who attended the festival, and what was on display.

First, let me tell you of one of the banners promoting the Coconut Festival, which was hung on the fence of the National Library, at the corner of Main and Church Streets in downtown Georgetown, just opposite the Cenotaph. It was an attractive and eye-catching piece of graphic art-work, and I am sure that it did the job for which it was placed there; and that was to inform and induce passers-by, to go to the Arthur Chung Convention Center on the Lower East Coast of Demerara, where the Coconut Festival was being held.     Continue reading

Guyana 411 – October 8, 2016 – featuring Homestead Farming

GINA logoGuyana 411 – October 8, 2016 – featuring Homestead Farming

THE AMAZING TREE – by Peter Halder

THE AMAZING TREE

(Adapted from an ancient Amerindian myth)

by Peter Halder

Hunger stalked the South American rainforest lands of the Carib Amerindian tribes. Cassava, yams, corn and other vegetables and fruits were nowhere to be found.

tapir-bush-cow

Tapir: bush-cow

The cacique (Chief) of a tribe noticed that while many starved and grew thin, a bush cow (tapir) was fat and sleek. Curious, the cacique kept a keen eye on the animal. He noticed that bush cow went out alone every morning and returned home, smiling and contented.

The Chief approached it and asked, “How come you look so strong, healthy and well fed while the rest of us are starving?”

“Who knows? Maybe it’s an act of nature,” replied the smiling bush cow.      Continue reading

History: The British economy depended on the Caribbean

The British economy depended on the Caribbean 

From Book: “The War for America” – by Piers Mackesy. 

For the British, the American Revolution quickly became a naval war with France over possession of the islands of the Caribbean. With their vast sugar plantations, these were more lucrative to Britain than the American colonies and more likely to remain colonies over the long run. Furthermore, the French had lost key Caribbean possessions to Britain during the recent French and Indian War that had ended in 1763, and viewed the American Revolution as their opportunity to regain them:

“Why this obsession [of the British] with the West Indies? [Lord] Sandwich had predicted that the war aims of France would be to overturn the peace of 1763 and regain her empire and her markets; and that for the sake of the American alliance she would forget her claim to Canada, and look for her reward in the sub-tropics — in India, West Africa and the Caribbean. And he was right.       Continue reading

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