Category Archives: Arts / Culture

Seven Guyanese honored by the Guyana Action Committee (GAC) in NYC

Seven Guyanese honored at fundraising event

HOW COME – By Dave Martins + music video

HOW COME – By Dave Martins  – Credits Stabroek News.

Dave Martins

One of the things I’ve noticed about people in the arts field – writers, painters, architects, etc – is that they are unconventional thinkers so that although they are people who obviously operate vertically, they are also observers, in an almost horizontal manner, of mankind.  An example of this is that I have noticed that often completely engrossed in some creative project, I will suddenly be caught by a completely extraneous thought that has no relation to my project.  Most of these wanderings are usually brief but I will often find myself left with the “how come” question still nagging me. (I may have gone down this road before, but new “how come” examples keep popping up.)     Continue reading

Annual Health Education Family Funday – Brooklyn. NY. – July 22, 2017

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Barbara Atherly – International Civil Servant – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Barbara Atherly – International Civil Servant

By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Barbara Atherly

Her life is rich, rewarding and purposeful. She carries herself with humility and charm and she is currently Guyana’s Consul General to New York. But Barbara Atherly is much more. She is an international civil servant that has made a difference in the lives of others. This fearless woman has worked in some of the most challenging places on the planet to bring relief to children and she has done so with grace and dignity.

Barbara is an anthropologist’s dream: she has lived in different cultures, has involved herself in the lives of the communities and has helped to bring about positive changes wherever she was posted. Barbara was born in Charlestown in Georgetown, Guyana, but she grew up in Durban Street.    Continue reading

Down Independence Boulevard And Other Stories by Ken Puddicombe

From the  Rosaliene Bacchus Blog

Three Worlds One Vision

Book Cover - Down Independence Boulevard and Other Stories by Ken Puddicombe

On May 26, Guyana celebrates 51 years as an independent nation. Independence did not come easy. Worker strikes, riots, lootings, burnings, beatings, rape, and killings turned the coexistence of the country’s multi-ethnic population into a toxic stew of animosity and mistrust. The so-called “racial disturbances” of the 1960s drove hundreds from their homes. Those who could, fled overseas.

In his collection of sixteen short stories, Down Independence Boulevard And Other Stories, Guyanese-Canadian author Ken Puddicombe, who migrated to Canada in 1971, takes us within the homes of families faced with racial violence and upheaval. With the keen eyes of a master story teller, Puddicombe lays bare their ruptured lives and re-invention as immigrants in a foreign country.

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We are nothing but shadow and mist – By Freddie Kissoon

We are nothing but shadow and mist

Freddie Kissoon

Here are some of the lyrics from the theme song of the movie, “Last Tango in Paris,” definitely the second greatest existentialist film ever made after the Italian masterpiece, “La Dolce Vita.”

“We don’t exist
We are nothing but shadow and mist
In the mirror we look as we pass
No reflection’s revealed in the glass
Don’t you know that the blood in your vein is as lifeless
as yesterday’s rain?
It’s a game where we come to conceal – the confusion we feel” 

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Guyanese Professor John R. Rickford Awarded Highest Academic Honor in the U.S.A.

GUYANESE PROFESSOR AWARDED HIGHEST ACADEMIC HONOR IN THE U.S.A.

Prof. John Rickford

Guyanese-American Professor John R. Rickford of Stanford University was recently notified that he had been awarded one of the highest academic honors in the United States: Election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Founded in 1780, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences is one of the oldest and most prestigious learned societies and independent policy research centers in the U.S., convening leaders from the academic, business, and government sectors to respond to the challenges facing—and opportunities available to—the nation and the world.

The Academy’s work is advanced by its elected members, who are leaders in the academic disciplines, the arts, business, and public affairs from around the world.    Continue reading

St Stanislaus College Alumni – Toronto – SAINTS CARIBJAM – August 4, 2017

On the Making of My Convent Novel – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Three Worlds One Vision

When my friend and poet, Angela Consolo Mankiewicz, told me that my second novel had to be about my life in the convent, I balked at the idea. To embark on a journey back to a time and place that caused me grief would require some meaningful purpose. The 2012 documentary film, Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God, exploring the first known public protest against clerical sex abuse in the US, gave me the impetus I needed.

My convent novel, inspired by real events that took place in Guyana in the 1970s, had to be relevant to the present. To bash the nuns and priests would be unjust. Most religious men and women that I lived and worked with had devoted their lives to their God and strove to live according to His teachings. I have long forgiven those who had betrayed or abandoned me when…

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CALYPSO HUMOUR – by Dave Martins + music videos

CALYPSO HUMOUR – by Dave Martins. – Credits Stabroek News.

Dave Martins

From time to time on this ubiquitous internet that parades things before us; one often sees presentations reminding us of aspects of our lives that are no more. Many of them treat with life in North America where such things as the hand-cranked telephone or the steam locomotive with the operator shoveling coal are no longer in existence, along with ladies’ dresses touching the ground or the looping chain draping a man’s trousers as evidence of a watch in his waist-line.

In a similar presentation in Guyana we would no longer see the street vendor patiently making a “press” with his hand shaver (the shaving now is done by machine, and the product name is “snow cone”) or someone like Garamai, basket on bicycle handle-bar, selling his famous potato balls around Georgetown.     Continue reading

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