Category Archives: Economics/Finance

Young people living in a ‘suspended adulthood’, finds UK research

Young people living in a ‘suspended adulthood’, finds UK research

Significant numbers of under 30s lack self-confidence and are at risk of mental health problems, with women worst affected, says report

People outside a Cafe, Brick Lane, East London
Of the 4,000 18 to 30 year-olds interviewed for the survey, 43% still live at home. Photograph: Diverse Image/Getty Images/UIG

Despair, worries about the future and financial pressures are taking a toll on millions of young Britons, according to a major new poll that also found young women were suffering in particular.

Low pay and lack of work in today’s Britain are resulting in “suspended adulthood”, with many living or moving back in with their parents and putting off having children, according to the poll of thousands of 18 to 30 year-olds.          Continue reading

Corruption and Big Business Triumph in Brazil – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Three Worlds One Vision

new-brazil-president-michel-temer-august-31-2016

New Brazil President Michel Temer – August 31, 2016
Photo Credit: Pensa Brasil

On August 31, 2016, following her four-month battle against members of congress calling for her impeachment, Brazil’s first female president Dilma Rousseff lost by 61 to 20 Senate votes. The corrupt political class and their Big Business collaborators won the day. Michel Temer – Rousseff’s former Vice President and ally from the right-wing Brazilian Democratic Movement Party (PMDB) – now governs Brazil until her mandate ends in 2018.

After thirteen years of economic boom then bust, the government of Brazil’s center-left socialist democratic Workers Party (PT) became the victim of a parliamentary coup d’état. The former president and popular PT leader Luiz Inacio ‘Lula’ da Silva now faces charges of masterminding the Petrobras graft scandal intended to make him ineligible to run for the presidency at the next election.

Brazil’s Workers Party is by no means exempt…

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Why Brexit will save The EU – Economist Mark Blyth – video

Why Brexit will save The EU – Economist Mark Blyth – video

The Conversation Room

Mark Blyth professor at Brown University discusses how the European Union has abandoned working people, has been hijacked by corporate interests & why Brexit may be the wake up call needed for the Union to change course

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‘Fat and lazy’ Britain is ill-prepared to secure future outside EU – UK Trade Secretary

‘Fat and lazy’ Britain is ill-prepared to secure future outside EU, says Fox

International trade secretary Liam Fox says business leaders have no appetite for the deals and exports needed to survive after the vote for Brexit 

Liam Fox, the international trade secretary

Liam Fox,

 – The Guardian –  Saturday 10 September 2016

Fox, a former GP and staunch Eurosceptic, suggested business executives would rather be playing golf on a Friday afternoon than negotiating export deals.

He made the remarks, first reported by the Times, at a Conservative Way Forward event for business leaders in parliament.   Continue reading

Guyana 411 – Hinterland Development – Region 9 – Upper Takutu and Upper Essequibo

Guyana 411 – Hinterland Development – Region 9 – Upper Takutu and Upper Essequibo

map-of-guyana-regions

Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo (Region 9) is a region of Guyana bordering the region of Potaro-Siparuni to the north, the region of East Berbice-Corentyne to the east and Brazil to the south and west. It contains the towns Aishalton, Lethem, Good Hope and Surama. It is also the largest region of Guyana. Sir John Noe was an English missionary there.

The Rupununi savannah is located between the Rupununi River and the Brazilian border.

Population

The Government of Guyana has administered three official censuses since the 1980 administrative reforms, in 1980, 1991 and 2002.[2] In 2012, the population of Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo was recorded at 24,212 people.[3] Official census records for the population of the Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo region are as follows:

  • 2012 : 24,212      2002 : 19,387      1991 : 15,058      1980 : 12,873

List of communities (including name variants):   see list here  by Wikipedia

Guyana: Oil by 2020 – Exxon pegs production at 100,000 barrels per day

Oil by 2020 – Exxon pegs production at 100,000 barrels per day

By Ravin Singh

Exxon-Mobil- Deep Water Champion Oil Exploration Rig

Exxon-Mobil- Deep Water Champion Oil Exploration Rig

GUYANA is poised to start, from as early as 2020, producing an estimated 100,000 barrels of “good quality” oil per day, ExxonMobil has revealed. The announcement, made yesterday by ExxonMobil’s Country Manager Jeff Simon at a media engagement at Cara Lodge in Georgetown, saw Simon explaining that mainly drilling will be done between 2016 and 2019.

In May 2015, after having drilled the first Liza-1 well in the Stabroek Bloc offshore Guyana, the company made its first announcement of an oil find. In June this year, following the drilling of the Liza-2 well, another announcement was made of a “world-class discovery” of between 800 million and 1.4 billion barrels of oil. The company is presently drilling the Liza-3 well in preparation for exploration in about four to five years’ time.  Continue reading

The next manufacturing revolution is here – Olivier Scalabre – TED Video

The next manufacturing revolution is here – Olivier Scalabre – TED Video

                      Click link above to view the video

Olivier Scalabre

Economic growth has been slowing for the past 50 years, but relief might come from an unexpected place — a new form of manufacturing that is neither what you thought it was nor where you thought it was. Industrial systems thinker Olivier Scalabre details how a fourth manufacturing revolution will produce a macroeconomic shift and boost employment, productivity and growth.

Olivier Scalabre Industrial systems thinker  – Full bio
BCG’s Olivier Scalabre analyzes the evolution of large industrial companies’ manufacturing footprint and operations.

Guyana’s Natural Resources: Zero Tolerance for Vaitarna and Bai Shan Lin – xpressblogg.com

Guyana- loggingOpinion - commentary -analysisThe sudden decision by China to provide aid to Guyana was hardly puzzling.

We knew that another principle of distributive justice was at work; one that was not formally articulated, perhaps deliberately muted because of the disparate goals of the parties at the deal table.

The world was already watching on at the not so subtle creep of China into the Caribbean and surrounding countries that shared the same dependency on foreign aid because the choices of their post colonial leaders – selfish governance, greed, corruption – led to economic underdevelopment and stagnation that left these countries sitting on potential they were unable to develop.

India, its equally insidious partner, was hot on its heels and did not go unnoticed, either.    Continue reading

The Nauru Files – Australia’s Other Stolen Generation – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

The Nauru Files – Australia’s Other Stolen Generation

Nauri

Australia asylum seekers on the island of Nauru

By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Long before Nauru, Australia had stolen Generations. During the years 1970-1970 thousands of aboriginal children were forcibly removed from their families, ‘to be placed in boys and girls homes, foster families or missions. At the age of eighteen they were released into white society mostly scarred for life by their experiences.’

Why were the children stolen? It is argued that the idea was to assimilate the aboriginal population into the white society through a process of ‘breeding out.’ The logic was to make Australian society completely white in three generations. The policy backfired and it remains a dark chapter in Australian history.   Continue reading

CARICOM – THE DEBT TRAP – commentary

THE DEBT TRAP

Opinion - commentary -analysisAug 21, 2016 Editorial, Kaieteur News

 Guyana’s small but encouraging success in its attempts to reduce the stranglehold of debt on the economy is proof that the country and its CARICOM counterparts continue to be among the most indebted countries in the world. And while none of these countries are very wealthy, based on North American and European standards, they are not overly poor either and there is hardly any starvation among their populations.

Guyana’s debt, which is approximately US$1.65billion continues to be a major impediment to economic growth and human and sustainable development. It has deprived the government of the ability to use monetary policy to promote growth and provide the path for improved lives. It has become obvious to the authorities that everything has to be done to reduce the debt, because it is economically unwise for the nation to be burdened by such a huge liability.

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