Category Archives: Education

Call for a semantic shift—Time to retire the “M” word – By Yvonne Sam

Call for a semantic shift—Time to retire the “M” word

By Yvonne Sam

The term “minority” is part of a media language entangled in equivoques and the tortured complicated syntax that serves to unveil Quebec’s avoidance of straight talk about race relations.

Over the course of history, Blacks have struggled (and still continue), to have the “N” word totally removed from thought, word and deed. Using one word or phrase to describe an entire group of people, never fully captures the nuances of that group. True power lies in specificity.      Continue reading

Celebrating 180th Anniversary of Indian Arrivals Day in Guyana 

Celebrating 180th Anniversary of Indian Arrivals Day in Guyana 

By Vidur Dindayal

 It is truly wonderful that we are celebrating Indian Arrivals Day. We say thanksgiving prayers to our forbears who suffered and toiled to make a good life for themselves and for us who follow them. We thank them for clearing the path and building a home for us to live and prosper in Guyana, in the new world, far away from mother India.

180 years ago our ancestors first set foot in Guyana. The first batch, 249 in all, sailed from India in the SS Whitby on 13 January 1838 and arrived in Guyana on 5 May 1838 after a voyage of 112 days. The first landings were 164 passengers at Highbury, East Bank Berbice. The SS Hesperus with 165 on board sailed from Calcutta on 29 January 1838 and arrived in Guyana on the night of 5 May 1838.       Continue reading

Guyanese jeweler receives UNESCO award

Juliana Hughes proudly displays her UNESCO Award of Excellence for handicrafts, against the backdrop of scores of her natural jewelry.
Guyanese jeweler receives UNESCO award
Juliana Hughes was presented with the United Nations Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Award of Excellence for Handicrafts, for her commitment to ecology — utilizing seeds and beads, found in her homeland of Guyana, to create fine jewelry.       Continue reading

A history of Buxton Village on the East Coast Demerara. Guyana

A history of Buxton Village on the East Coast Demerara. Guyana

By: Murphy Browne  ©  April 19-2018

In April 1840 Buxton Village was established on the East Coast, Demerara, British Guiana by 128 Africans who had been freed from chattel slavery on August 1st, 1838. The Africans pooled their money and bought a 500-acre plantation, New Orange Nassau from its owner James Archibald Holmes, for $50,000. They named the village Buxton in honour of abolitionist Thomas Fowell Buxton. Buxton was the second village established by Africans in British Guiana. Victoria Village, also on the East Coast of Demerara was purchased in November 1839, by a group of 83 formerly enslaved Africans.     Continue reading

How the mainstream woke up to black excellence – The Guardian UK

How the mainstream woke up to black excellence

This week the unparalleled contributions of black performers were finally recognised by the establishment. Why has it taken so long?

Beyoncé, who has just headlined at Coachella, and Kendrick Lamar, who has won a Pulitzer prize, the first for a hip-hop artist.
 ‘We seem to be having a moment’ … Beyoncé, who has just headlined at Coachella, and Kendrick Lamar, who has won a Pulitzer prize, the first for a hip-hop artist. Composite: Getty Images

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UK Politics: Theresa May has created hostility to all immigrants

It’s not just Windrush. Theresa May has created hostility to all immigrants

There has been no bureaucratic snafu. The error was that the dragnet picked up some people who fall into a popular sympathy sweet spot

Theresa May, then home secretary, at the Conservative party conference in Manchester in 2011. Photograph: Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

To the politicians who presided over a long-term policy to use every means possible to reject and eject as many people from the UK, regardless of extenuating circumstances or status (up to and including whether they came to the country as British subjects or citizens), the Windrush scandal appears to be an aberration.

Amber Rudd called the treatment “appalling”, as if she had no responsibility for it as the current home secretary. Caroline Nokes, the immigration minister, revealed that there had been deportations but that she did not know how many, and that the situation “as a minister” had “appalled” her.          READ MORE

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/apr/19/windrush-theresa-may-immigrants

 

Dear Prince Charles, do you think my brown skin makes me unBritish?

Dear Prince Charles, do you think my brown skin makes me unBritish?

The Prince of Wales told me I don’t look like I’m from Manchester. If this is how he thinks, he shouldn’t be the next head of the Commonwealth
Anita Sethi meeting Prince Charles at the Commonwealth People’s Forum in London
 Anita Sethi meeting Prince Charles at the Commonwealth People’s Forum in London. ‘I feel angry that there could be such casual ignorance in the corridors of power.’ Photograph: Vinya Ariyaratne

met Prince Charles this week at the Commonwealth People’s Forum at which I was a speaker (on a day whose itinerary was entitled Politics of Hope: Taking on Injustice in the Commonwealth). It was part of the buildup to the Commonwealth heads of government meeting, the summit of leaders of 53 countries representing more than 2 billion people.

Read more:     Continue reading

What it’s REALLY like to be a nurse – by Business Insider

What it’s REALLY like to be a nurse – by Business Insider

  • Nurses are the life and soul of the healthcare profession, providing comfort, kindness, and care to patients every day
  • It’s a challenging job and one that requires hard work, dedication, and a very thick skin.       Continue reading

Breakfast Morning to help St. Stephen’s School in Guyana – Brooklyn NY – May 19. 2018


Sponsored by the South Georgetown Secondary School Alumni Association

Vile Abuse is Now Tolerated in Our Universities – Nigel Biggar | The Times UK

Vile Abuse is Now Tolerated in Our Universities

Nigel Biggar | The Times UK

The spitting hatred I suffered over my views on empire shows our democratic values are in peril

OMG, this is serious shit. We need to SHUT THIS DOWN”. So ran one of the earliest tweets to greet the news of the launch of my “Ethics and Empire” project last December. And there was more where that came from: my scholarship was “supremacist shite”, I was a “racist” and a “bigot”, and whatever came out of my mouth was “vomit”.         Continue reading

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