Category Archives: History

Guyana’s Eusi Kwayana will be 90 on April 4, 2015

Eusi Kwayana will be 90 on April 4, 2015  – (see note at end of this entry)

eusi Kwayana -in 2014

eusi Kwayana -in 2014 at the Walter Rodney Inquiry

The following links were compiled by the St Stanislaus College Blog

 Eusi Kwayana, formerly Sydney King (born 4 April 1925),[1] is a Guyanese politician. A cabinet minister in the People’s Progressive Party (PPP) government of 1953, he was detained by the British Army in 1954. Later he left the PPP to form ASCRIA (African Society for Cultural Relations with Independent Africa), a Pan-Africanist grassroots political group that, after a brief flirtation with the People’s National Congress (PNC) of Forbes Burnham, fused into the Working People’s Alliance (WPA).

Biography  – From Wikipedia.org: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eusi_Kwayana He was born in Lusignan, Guyana, and his family moved to Buxton when he was aged seven. He became a primary school teacher at the age of 15. In 1956 he founded and became principal of County High School, later renamed Republic Cooperative High School, in Buxton.[2]    Continue reading

Jagdeo and the PPP – Lifestyle and Politics – by Ralph Ramkarran

JAGDEO AND THE PPP – LIFESTYLE AND POLITICS

Ralph Ramkarran

Ralph Ramkarran

Posted on March 21, 2015 –  by

In an article for my blog, www.conversationtree.gy, published in SN last Sunday, I took issue with a statement by former President Jagdeo that implied that Cheddi and Janet Jagan lived in luxury. His argument that the Jagans lived such a lifestyle, comparable to his own at the time his house was built, was an attempt to justify his own Cadillac lifestyle, which over the past few years has come under severe scrutiny and criticism.

There were outraged responses by many people to Jagdeo’s statement, including from Clem Seecharran and, more indirectly, Peter Fraser, two distinguished Guyanese historians living and working in the UK. But the most telling came from Nadira Jagan-Brancier, the Jagan daughter, Dr. Tulsie Dyal Singh and Sadie Amin. Dr. Singh, who conferred with Dr Jagan about his medical condition just before he died and visited his home, said that his own family home in Palmyra on the Corentyne when he was growing up in the 1950s was of similar size to the Jagan home. Sadie Amin gave a description of the modest lifestyle and home of the Jagans, including its leaking roof.   Continue reading

Nostalgia 372 – The Fabulous Fifties in Guyana – By Godfrey Chin

Nostalgia 372 – The Fabulous Fifties in Guyana – By Godfrey Chin

Updated in 2008 by the late Godfrey Chin 1937-2012

With Guyana celebrating it’s 42nd Anniversary of Independence, May 26 .. I share this Nostalgia as a ‘stimulant’ to these ‘topsy-turvy times’. Lets meet at LasLapLime, Toronto , Canada where my Pictorial Exhibition – of 1001 Guyana Delights – will be featured. Please introduce yourself. Ya think it easy!………GODc.

Nostalgia 372 – The Fabulous Fifties in Guyana.

Godfrey Chin Website Link

Godfrey Chin – “Nostalgias”

By Godfrey Chin

“It was the Best of Times”. My great Grandfather boasted this at the commencement of the last century, when for $1.50 he bought his family house rations for a week. Now at the dawn of this new Millennium, my three sons with their streaming high tech ‘Blackberry,’ relish their times as ‘the best.’

On the contrary – every generation looks upon their times ‘and wonder what the ‘world is coming to’. Yet every generation survives – for the next – to wring their hands in turn – a few decades later.  Mankind’s ingenuity always overcomes.

For me a Nostalgia Buff, I choose the Fabulous Fifties as the best of times in Guyana – these last hundred years. Isn’t it quite a coincidence that ‘this was the Centerfold Decade’ – a period when most of the Guyanese foremost Icons and Professionals today, were just completing their Public/Secondary education – and  everlasting footprints were already being ‘carved’.   Continue reading

“Guyanese or Indo-Caribbean?” – By Aminta Kilawan

“Guyanese or Indo-Caribbean?”

ACKHeadshot

Aminta Kilawan

By Aminta Kilawan

Hot cross buns-hot cross buns-one a penny-two a penny-hot cross buns,” my dad would sing, with an air of nostalgia reminiscing about Eastertime in Guyana. On Good Friday, an Afro-Guyanese woman would walk down the road singing the tune, with fresh buns in a basket on her head, distributing to her Rose Hall Town neighbors in remembrance of Jesus’ crucifixion.

My dad and his family are Hindu. His weekly chore as a child was to offer prayers and flowers in the murthi-laden mandir built in their backyard. Yet my dad and numerous other Hindus attended Sunday school, where they learned and recited the Psalms in the Bible. When I saw my parents close their eyes and state the “Our Father” at my junior high school graduation Mass, I was taken aback by them, the very individuals who taught me the popular Hindu prayer “Twameva Mata.” Continue reading

Women’s History Month: Women of Substance – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Women’s History Month: Women of Substance 

By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

‘If your dreams don’t scare you then you are not dreaming big enough,’ says Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf to the class of 2011 at Harvard. Little did she know that in 2014 her country would have needed all her leadership skills to combat Ebola.

If all goes well Liberia will be declared free from Ebola in Aril 2015. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Leymah Gwobee and Tawakkol Karman. These three women won the 2011 Nobel Peace Prize. They are in the forefront in the fi ght for truth, justice and equality in their respective countries. Ellen and Lemyah are from Liberia while Tawakkol is from Yemen. It is the first time in the history of the Nobel Prize Committee that three women have had this honor conferred on them in a single year.  Continue reading

Guyana Elections: DISCORDANT NOTES – by Ralph Ramkarran

DISCORDANT NOTES

Ralph Ramkarran

Ralph Ramkarran

Posted on March 14, 2015 –  by Ralph Ramkarran

As expected, the events at Babu John attracted wide attention and media coverage. A front page photograph in SN of President Ramotar belting out Bob Marley’s ‘Let’s Get Together’ was in striking contrast to the accusation by Dr. Bharat Jagdeo that during the 2011 elections, the Opposition APNU had sent drummers around calling on their supporters to ‘let’s get the coolies out,’ or words to that effect. Observers heard these two discordant notes, one a plea for unity in song, the other a divisive rant, and several others this past week.

The accusation against the PNCR created a storm and at press appearances, Dr. Jagdeo sought to defend his remarks. The PPP’s complaint is that it is treated unfairly. The media, it claims, focuses on the PPP and ignores the PNC’s historic appeal to racism. The fact is that when either political party appeals to its supporters to vote for its party, in whatever language, it is an appeal that is alleged to be directed to one ethnic group.   Continue reading

Europeans have been Looting & Destroying the Earth for 500 years – Chris Hedges video

Europeans have been Looting & Destroying the Earth for 500 years – By Chris Hedges

Feb 9, 2015 – Uploaded by seekingjustthefacts

Excerpts from a speech by Chris Hedges in which he addresses the … Europeans have been Looting & Destroying the Earth for 500 years.

Rudolph Dunbar – A Musician for the Ages – by Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Rudolph Dunbar – A Musician for the Ages

by Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Rudolph Dunbar

Rudolph Dunbar

One day someone will make a movie about Rudolph Dunbar.

The year was 1945 and Hitler and his troops were recently defeated after invading Europe. Berlin was the seat of Nazi culture but the Philharmonic Orchestra was led by a black conductor. He was a war correspondent for the United States but it was the baton that took him to the realm of the Gods. This conductor was a Guyanese who bestrode the musical world like a giant. Rudolph Dunbar mesmerized the 2000 Berliners in the audience. They applauded rapturously as he took them through the works of Weber’s Oberon and Tchaikovsky’s Pathetique. Rudolph Dunbar was given five standing ovations.

During the performance Dunbar did the unthinkable. He introduced music from the Afro-American symphony to the delight of the audience. On that evening Rudolph Dunbar created history. He had become Berlin’s first black conductor.  Continue reading

Female Musical Trailblazers: The first “All Girls Steel Bands” of Guyana* – By Lear Matthews

A women’s History Month Tribute

Female Musical Trailblazers: The first “All Girls Steel Bands” of Guyana*

By Lear Matthews

It was the early 1950’s. Guyana, then British Guiana, like many other Caribbean countries was in the initial stages of struggle to shed the yoke of colonialism, epitomized by the first national, multiethnic political party.  The dawning of “Massa Day Done”!

As with the political scene, “beating pan” was a male-dominated activity.  But despite normative cultural credence and challenges faced by women, pioneering genius was afoot. The phenomenon of a female steel orchestra was emerging.  Steel band was viewed as a lower class musical form, practiced by urban folk from economically deprived communities – “Dem Bad boys” from Albouystown and Lodge (although the majority of residents from those neighborhoods were decent, law abiding and productive).  Initially, steel band playing was not considered socially accepted as a legitimate genre of entertainment, thus deemed unworthy of invitation to perform at “prestigious venues” such as the Town Hall in Georgetown.   Continue reading

Women in Black History – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Women in Black History  – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

  • [The well-known names surface in the media when special events are celebrated. But how about those who made their contributions and are not in the limelight? The purpose of this article is to highlight the activities of these lesser known women so that readers can appreciate their work and legacies. ]
Dorothy Height (1912-2010)

Dorothy Height (1912-2010)

Light drives out darkness and love conquers hate. If the times aren’t ripe, then you have to ripen the times, Dorothy Height reminds us.

When one looks at the contributions of black women in history it becomes clear that they were undeniable sources of light and love. The literature is filled with examples of the rich and royal roles that black women have filled and how they were able to inspire others. We find that the impact of black women is often overlooked in the literature. Black women have housed, fed, cared for their families and faced the brunt of wars and pestilences. They have played important roles in freedom movements and in so doing inspired others to face the future with confidence.  Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,020 other followers

%d bloggers like this: