Category Archives: History

Guyana Elections: Dr. Yesu Persaud wants to see change urges Constitution reform

Dr. Yesu Persaud wants to see change urges Constitution reform

April 19, 2015 | By KNews | Filed Under News

Dr. Yesu Persaud

Dr. Yesu Persaud

One of the country’s most prominent businessmen, Dr. Yesu Persaud, believes that the time has come for a change and for the country’s Constitution to be reformed.

Dr. Yesu Persaud, who built the Demerara Distillers Limited into a powerhouse with its world renowned, award winning El Dorado rum line and soft drinks and created Demerara Bank and the Institute of Private Enterprise Development (IPED), has been critical for some time about the Constitution which he argued gives the Government too much power without accountability.

In return, he has also been scathingly criticized by the ruling People’s Progressive Party/Civic (PPP/C) for his comments.  Continue reading

Guyana Elections 2015: Jimmy Carter to lead Carter Center observers

Jimmy Carter to lead Carter Center observers

APRIL 16, 2015 · BY STABROEK EDITOR ·   COMMENTS

Jimmy Carter

Jimmy Carter

Former US President Jimmy Carter who played a pivotal role in spurring electoral reforms that led to free and fair elections in 1992 will be heading the Carter Center observer team to next month’s general elections.

The announcement was made today by the Atlanta, Georgia-based Carter Center. The Center had not mounted observer missions to the 2006 and 2011 elections. Calls were made by the private sector here and others for the Center to mount a mission.

The Carter Center press release issued April 16 follows:  Continue reading

Guyana Elections: Scare tactics can lead to serious consequences – commentary

Scare tactics can lead to serious consequences

April 16, 2015 | By KNews | Filed Under Editorial

Scare tactics are being used to garner votes during the upcoming elections. This is something that was once done extensively in small communities where landed people wanted to maintain control over the tenants. It was intended to make the people feel that they are better off where they are, that to take any step away from this path would be detrimental to their very existence.

However, as civilisation progressed, the rulers found that it was futile to introduce fear tactics into any election campaign. Of course, as far back as the Second World War, people in the various countries that comprised the allies and the axis forces set about instilling in their peoples the need to fear the other. Continue reading

Coming to Terms With the American Empire – commentary

Coming to Terms With the American Empire

Geopolitical WeeklyGeopolitical Weekly  – April 14, 2015 | 07:54 GMT  –By George Friedman

“Empire” is a dirty word. Considering the behavior of many empires, that is not unreasonable. But empire is also simply a description of a condition, many times unplanned and rarely intended. It is a condition that arises from a massive imbalance of power. Indeed, the empires created on purpose, such as Napoleonic France and Nazi Germany, have rarely lasted. Most empires do not plan to become one. They become one and then realize what they are. Sometimes they do not realize what they are for a long time, and that failure to see reality can have massive consequences.

World War II and the Birth of an Empire

The United States became an empire in 1945. It is true that in the Spanish-American War, the United States intentionally took control of the Philippines and Cuba. It is also true that it began thinking of itself as an empire, but it really was not. Cuba and the Philippines were the fantasy of empire, and this illusion dissolved during World War I, the subsequent period of isolationism and the Great Depression.   Continue reading

ON ETHNICITY – by Ralph Ramkarran

ON ETHNICITY

Ralph Ramkarran

Ralph Ramkarran

Posted on April 11, 2015  – by

I must confess that I have had an ambivalent attitude to ethnicity for most of my life. My mother was a Hindu and so were all my relatives on both sides of my family. I grew up in the midst of celebrations of Hindu religious festivals, tempered by the dominant influence of the Lutheran Church in my mixed community, as in much of Guyana.  Even though I was socialized as a Hindu and, therefore, considered myself, whatever the reality, as Indian by race, my approach to my own ethnicity was determined by factors that had little to do with high principle.

In my mid to late teenage years after I discovered girls, I unconsciously developed a certain approach on the issue of ethnicity, dictated by my dark complexion and curly hair which caused me to be viewed in a particular way.   Continue reading

Lee Kuan Yew: Father of Singapore – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Lee Kuan Yew: Father of Singapore

By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Lee_Kuan_Yew in 2002

Lee Kuan Yew

Lee Kuan Yew has provided the recipe for Singapore’s success. He said, ‘I am often accused of interfering in the private lives of citizens. Yes, if I did not, had I not done that, we wouldn’t be here today. And I say without the slightest remorse, that we wouldn’t be here, we would not have made economic progress, if we had not intervened on very personal matters-who your neighbor is, how you live, the noise you make, how you spit, or what language you use. We decide what is right. Never mind what people think.’

Lee Kuan Yew led Singapore for more than thirty years and his passing prompted many world leaders to pay their respects to him. President Barack Obama called him a ‘true giant of history and the father of modern Singapore. ’ David Cameron, the British Prime Minister, spoke of Mr. Lee and Margaret Thatcher in the same vein, as great state persons that were committed to change.  Continue reading

Guyana 2030: An Overview of Options & Opportunities for National Development + video

Guyana 2030: An Overview of Options & Opportunities (O3 ) for National Development – (see PDF slides and video presentation below)  

Guyana 2030This conceptual proposal being presented under the title ‘An Overview of Options & Opportunities (O3) for National Development’ for your consideration was crafted by Stanley Ming, Eric Phillips, Joseph Singh and Supriya Singh. It is a synthesis of historical and updated studies, implemented and planned projects, and interpretations that derive from the global environment. It represents the fundamentals of an integrated plan of action which will have a transformational impact in propelling Guyana into a modern, prosperous country for the well being of current and future generations.   Continue reading

Trevor Noah: the South African comic – new host of The Daily Show + video

Trevor Noah Live at the Apollo – Comedy video

Trevor Noah: the South African comic who sails close to the wind

Trevor Noah

Trevor Noah

Known for his charm and commercial savvy, new host of The Daily Show will also need to watch what he tweets, says Rebecca Davis      [The Guardian-March 31, 2015]

One of the interesting aspects of You Laugh But It’s True, a so-so 2011 documentary on Trevor Noah’s attempt to make it in comedy, was the sense you got that the young man’s success was deeply resented by some of his fellow South African comedians.

Asked what he thought of Noah, well-known local veteran Mel Miller rasped about how young black comics “mustn’t come bitching about apartheid”.   Continue reading

A Brief History of the Swahili Language

A Brief History of the Swahili Language

Countries where Swahili is spoken

Countries where Swahili is spoken (click to enlarge)

Origin

The Swahili language, is basically of Bantu (African) origin. It has borrowed words from other languages such as Arabic probably as a result of the Swahili people using the Quran written in Arabic for spiritual guidance as Muslims.

 As regards the formation of the Swahili culture and language, some scholars attribute these phenomena to the intercourse of African and Asiatic people on the coast of East Africa. The word “Swahili” was used by early Arab visitors to the coast and it means “the coast”. Ultimately it came to be applied to the people and the language.

Continue reading

Guyana’s Eileen Cox: Mum – a Feisty Fifties Feminist – By Sharon Maas

Guyana’s Eileen Cox – Mum – a Feisty Fifties Feminist

By Sharon Maas – March 8, 2015 

Eileen-Cox-4x2-memoLast November my mother died in Guyana, aged 96; I happened to be on a two-week visit from Germany, and it seemed she had been only waiting to see me one last time. Her death made front-page news in the country. Articles appeared in the papers, I was interviewed, and it wasn’t long before the tributes poured in, including condolence cards from the country’s President, the Prime Minister, and the Opposition Leader.

Mum was an icon in Guyana, a role model for people of all persuasions admired and respected. She made changes, and for this she received well-deserved accolades. For me, of course, her passing was far more personal. With it came the peace and closeness to her I had longed for all my life. It hadn’t been easy being her daughter.

Mum was always at least 50 years ahead of her time. The steps she took back in the 50’s might seem normal and self-evident to today’s young women, but in her day they were truly revolutionary; they went against the grain of society, and she took them alone, with no role models or living examples.   Continue reading

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