Category Archives: Philosophy

Trump Has Filled, Not Drained, The Swamp – Conor Friedersdorf | The Atlantic

Trump Has Filled, Not Drained, The Swamp

The president has made a mockery of a promise at the core of his campaign. It is time for the #MAGA media to tell his supporters the truth.

Conor Friedersdorf | The Atlantic

There is no campaign promise that Donald Trump has failed to honor more flagrantly than his oft repeated pledge to “drain the swamp” in Washington, D.C. He has violated the letter of his promise and trampled all over its spirit. His supporters ought to be furious. But few perceive the scale of his betrayal or its brazenness.

Forget the Russia investigation. Even if no wrongdoing is proved on that matter, the Trump Administration’s behavior would still be epically swampy. A list of examples is clarifying:    Continue reading

The Best Poems About Aging – from Shakespeare to present  

The Best Poems About Aging

There will come a point in our life where we all grow old. Approaching one’s winter years is a topic most poets are drawn to. Below are six of the finest poems about agingfrom Shakespeare to the current century.
 
beautiful aging poems

William Shakespeare, Sonnet 73 

That time of year thou may’st in me behold
When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
Upon those boughs which shake against the cold,
Bare ruin’d choirs, where late the sweet birds sang.
In me thou see’st the twilight of such day,
As after sunset fadeth in the west,      Continue reading

This Too Shall Pass – By by Aishwarya Shah

A great article from one of the followers of the Guyanese Online blog.

Eclipsed Words

“And this, too, shall pass.”

This is a proverb indicating that all material conditions, positive or negative, are temporary and time solves all problems.

I once read that the great Abraham Lincoln used to have a grand affinity for this proverb. On September 30, 1859, Abraham Lincoln included a similar story in an address before the Wisconsin State Agricultural Society in Milwaukee. This is what he said;
“It is said an Eastern monarch once charged his wise men to invent him a sentence, to be ever in view, and which should be true and appropriate in all times and situations. They presented him the words: “And this, too, shall pass away.”

How much it expresses! How chastening in the hour of pride! How consoling in the depths of affliction!

When we are in trouble, we feel that we are the only person who is facing these mountains full of doubts…

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The Magnificent Dreams of Guyanese Teens and those of other lands – by Francis Quamina Farrier

The Magnificent Dreams of Guyanese Teens – by Francis Quamina Farrier

Kelly Hyles of Guyana

A few months ago, the news of a New York-based Guyanese teenager reached us, to the effect that she had been accepted by all the eight Ivy League Colleges in the United States of America, to which she had applied. Such a magnificent  achievement by students in the United States, is not a regular happening. In fact it is becoming much more difficult for students to gain acceptance in any of America’s eight Ivy League colleagues. To gain entry in all eight is a magnificent achievement.

So when seventeen year old Guyanese-born, Kelly Hyles, formally of Vryheid’s Lust East Coast Demerara, and now based in Brooklyn, New York, realized that she was accepted by all of the eight Ivy League colleagues to which she had applied, it took quite a while for that achievement to sink in, according to her. Kelly’s achievement made history, since she is the first Guyanese to have done so. But it wasn’t easy.     Continue reading

Under the Cold Stones by Dan McNay – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Three Worlds One Vision

Book Cover - Under the Cold Stones by Dan McNay

Dan McNay, one of my favorite authors from Los Angeles, has a new novel out: Under the Cold Stones. It’s a dark, suspense thriller. The heroine, Deidre McIntyre, is well versed in men’s secret fantasies and dark desires. At the age of sixteen, she had run away from her small-town home in Paris, Illinois. Her mother, a heavy smoker with a drug habit, had been no role mother for the unloved, self-destructive teenager. Her father, “crazy as a loon,” had disappeared from her life when she was seven. Only he had held the power to save her from herself. She had found refuge and a new life as a hooker in the New Orleans French Quarter, where she became known as Daydee.

Everything changes for Daydee after her mother’s death. As the only surviving member of the family, she inherits everything: a ten-room apartment building (with no tenants), a farm…

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Donald’s Trump’s exit would not end of domestic estrangement – By Yvonne Sam

Donald’s Trump’s exit would not be the end of domestic estrangement

By Yvonne Sam

Oh! America how deluded can you get. Donald John Trump is not the nation’s foremost problem, not even when Irma has wreaked her havoc and left.  If only it were as easy as replacing one man or even riding out two terms to resolve your grievances to the end. Notwithstanding what faces you is more than that, and will require more work and effort.

Let there be no modicum of misunderstanding, Donald Trump placed an indelible stain on his tenure when he hesitated in his initial reaction to marchers shouting “Sieg Heil” and “Jews will not replace us.” His first condemnation of the “hatred, bigotry, and violence on many sides” asserted a moral equivalency where there was none.    Continue reading

Vertopoeia: An Urban Fantasy – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Vertopoeia: An Urban Fantasy – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

The city became a village. Dan George dusted the tome. It was more than 500 years old. The idea was to bend the universe, to create perfection in a place called ‘nowhere.’ But Amaurot was . It invaded the imagination, regarded people as more than abstract statistics and had its own codes and dramaturgy. Dan George stood in the future. It was a brave and different world.

The shaman had predicted that the structures of reciprocity would tumble. Myths and dreams would be ruptured by the echo of falling trees. Oil hunters would shake the land and the seas. They would squeeze the saplings dry in a brisk trade to get the green dollar to construct vertopoeia.    Continue reading

Why Silicon Valley is embracing universal basic income (UBI)

Why Silicon Valley is embracing universal basic income

In a pilot study influential incubator Y Combinator will hand over cash monthly to 100 families in Oakland, California. What’s UBI’s payoff for tech entrepreneurs?

Silicon Valley has, paradoxically, become one of the most vocal proponents of universal basic income (UBI). Venture capitalist Marc Andreessen, web guru Tim O’Reilly and a cadre of other Silicon Valley denizens have expressed support for the “social vaccine of the 21st century”, and influential incubator Y Combinator announced on 31 May that it will be conducting its own basic income experiment with a pilot study of 100 families in Oakland, California – a short hop over the San Francisco bay.

Y Combinator will give each family between $1,000 and $2,000 a month, for between six months to a year, to be spent on anything anywhere. Oakland, as Y Combinator says, is “a city of great social and economic diversity, and it has both concentrated wealth and considerable inequality”.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/jun/22/silicon-valley-universal-basic-income-y-combinator

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How the gig economy is helping make the case for universal basic income

With technology threatening the total number of available jobs, some Americans could benefit from such a stipend – but not everyone is convinced

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/us-money-blog/2016/jun/09/universal-basic-income-gig-economy-technology

Silicon Valley siphons our data like oil. But the deepest drilling has just begun

Silicon Valley siphons our data like oil. But the deepest drilling has just begun

A Facebook Storage Facility in Sweden

Personal data is to the tech world what oil is to the fossil fuel industry. That’s why companies like Amazon and Facebook plan to dig deeper than we ever imagined

What if a cold drink cost more on a hot day?

Customers in the UK will soon find out. Recent reports suggest that three of the country’s largest supermarket chains are rolling out surge pricing in select stores. This means that prices will rise and fall over the course of the day in response to demand. Buying lunch at lunchtime will be like ordering an Uber at rush hour.

This may sound pretty drastic, but far more radical changes are on the horizon. About a week before that report, Amazon announced its $13.7bn purchase of Whole Foods. A company that has spent its whole life killing physical retailers now owns more than 460 stores in three countries.

Read more:  https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/aug/23/silicon-valley-big-data-extraction-amazon-whole-foods-facebook

Guyana’s Indigenous Amerindian traditional conservation strategies

Guyana’s Indigenous Amerindian traditional conservation strategies may be shared with Guiana Shield

Darwin Initiative’s Project Leader, Dr. Jay Mistry

A British-funded three-year project to integrate Amerindian traditional knowledge into national environmental conservation policy and practice is likely to serve as a pilot project for the rest of the Guiana Shield while ensuring that Guyana achieves benchmarks of several international agreements.

The project is being undertaken by the Darwin Initiative, which was launched by Britain at the Rio Earth Summit in 1992, and is funded by the United Kingdom’s Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, the Department for International Development and the Foreign Commonwealth Office.     Continue reading

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