Category Archives: Religion

Book Review:  Mahathi’s “Hare Krishna”- by Leonard Dabydeen

Book Review:  Mahathi’s “Hare Krishna”- by Leonard Dabydeen

Author: Mahathi – Book: Hare Krishna

Mahathi

Mahathi is the author’s pen name. His true name is Mydavolu Venkatasesha Sathyanarayana.

Publisher: Prowess Publishing, May 2, 2017   Pages (Print Length) Paperback 402 pages

ASIN B071VDC76Y

ISBN  978 161 813 284   Kindle  Paperback.  See Availability below

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Read more: Book Review – Mahathi’s Hare Krishna – by Leonard Dabydeen

We Fear Death, But What If Dying Isn’t as Bad as We Think? – Jessica Brown | The Guardian UK

We Fear Death, But What If Dying Isn’t as Bad as We Think?

Research comparing perceptions of death with accounts of those imminently facing it suggest that maybe we shouldn’t worry so much about our own end

Jessica Brown | The Guardian UK

“The idea of death, the fear of it, haunts the human animal like nothing else,” wrote Earnest Becker in his book, The Denial of Death. It’s a fear strong enough to compel us to force kale down our throats, run sweatily on a treadmill at 7am on a Monday morning, and show our genitals to a stranger with cold hands and a white coat if we feel something’s a little off.    

But our impending end isn’t just a benevolent supplier of healthy behaviours. Researchers have found death can determine our prejudices, whether we give to charity or wear sun cream, our desire to be famous, what type of leader we vote for, how we name our children and even how we feel about breastfeeding.        Continue reading

A History of Africa – Includes BBC Articles and Videos

Ancient History of Africa Documentary 2017

……    Continue reading

Book: Red Coconut: Bridging the Racial Divide – by Habeeb Alli

Red Coconut: Bridging the Racial Divide

A Collection of Poems and Essays Surrounding Interfaith Relationships

Synopsis

I present to you my eighteenth book entitled Red Coconut: Bridging the Racial Divide. Bridging the racial divide is what I do every day, and my collection of poems and essays this year speaks precisely of this. A man who picked up a dying fish as he and his friend walked the seashore was asked, “Why do you do that? You cannot save all these dying fishes!” He replied, “But it made a world of difference to this one!” One heart at a time, one community a time, we can make a difference.

Read more and order: https://www.kobo.com/ca/en/ebook/red-coconut-bridging-the-racial-divide

The Pope and the Powerless – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

The Pope and the Powerless – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

US President Donald Trump and Pope Francis

We come from everywhere Africa, Europe, Asia, Latin America We hide in the bowels of ships And stowaway in the cargo of planes. Dodge bullets and run from dogs. And get nightmares about fences and walls.

We do these things and more. To experience the land of liberty-and dreams. And to provide for our families. So they too can say they are Americans.         Continue reading

The Catholic Church: Australian Cardinal George Pell fights sexual abuse charges

Cardinal George Pell’s profile: the pope’s Australian hardman faces the fight of his life

Cardinal George Pell

David Marr  commentary …. on the long and often controversial career of a ‘bright kid’ who rose from rural Australia to the highest reaches of the Catholic church.

bright kid from an Australian bush town, George Pell kept his nose clean as he rose through the ranks to become chief of the Vatican’s finances. Despite a notably hard heart he was always a valuable asset to the church as a fearless conservative ideologue and a fine administrator.

Young Pell was plucked from Australia to train in Rome and at Oxford for the big career that was always beckoning. He returned to serve briefly and unhappily in a remote parish on the Murray before being brought into the heart of the diocese of Ballarat which was a hell of child abuse.

Pell swears he saw little or nothing in those years.       [Read more]

“Forget Terrorism”: The Real Reason Behind The Qatar Crisis Is Natural Gas – By Tyler Durden

“Forget Terrorism”: The Real Reason Behind The Qatar Crisis Is Natural Gas

According to the official narrative, the reason for the latest Gulf crisis in which a coalition of Saudi-led states cut off diplomatic and economic ties with Qatar, is because – to everyone’s “stunned amazement” – Qatar was funding terrorists, and after Trump’s recent visit to Saudi Arabia in which he urged a crackdown on financial support of terrorism, and also following the FT’s report that Qatar has directly provided $1 billion in funding to Iran and al-Qaeda spinoffs, Saudi Arabia finally had had enough of its “rogue” neighbor, which in recent years had made ideologically unacceptable overtures toward both Shia Iran and Russia.

However, as often happens, the official narrative is traditionally a convenient smokescreen from the real underlying tensions.    Continue reading

Buxton-Friendship Express newsletter – May 2017

Fellow Buxtonian/Friend,

Please enjoy our May 2017 issue of Buxton-Friendship Express. You may download the attached copy, or click on the following link to read:

http://buxtonguyana.net/Buxton-FriendshipExpress2017-05.pdf

Regards,

Lorna Campbell

Editor, Buxton-Friendship Express

buxtonexpress@aol.com

Attached copy:

Download: https://guyanaassociations.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/buxton-friendshipexpress-may-2017.pdf

On the Making of My Convent Novel – By Rosaliene Bacchus

Three Worlds One Vision

When my friend and poet, Angela Consolo Mankiewicz, told me that my second novel had to be about my life in the convent, I balked at the idea. To embark on a journey back to a time and place that caused me grief would require some meaningful purpose. The 2012 documentary film, Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God, exploring the first known public protest against clerical sex abuse in the US, gave me the impetus I needed.

My convent novel, inspired by real events that took place in Guyana in the 1970s, had to be relevant to the present. To bash the nuns and priests would be unjust. Most religious men and women that I lived and worked with had devoted their lives to their God and strove to live according to His teachings. I have long forgiven those who had betrayed or abandoned me when…

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Mothers and Mothers-in-Law – by Francis Quamina Farrier

Mothers and Mothers-in-Law – by Francis Quamina Farrier

Francis Quamina Farrier

Today, Mother’s Day 2017, has come at a time when both my mother and mother-in-law are no longer with us. My mother Stella passed away in 1963 at age 58. My mother-in-law Olive passed away in 2016 at age 105. My mother delivered six children. Two died in infancy. My mother-in-law delivered ten children. Two died in infancy. Both my mother, Stella, and my mother-in-law, Olive, were very strong women who laid down the law in the home for their children. Simple though they were, both were fantastic mothers. Their Law-abiding lives were a great contribution to the smoother running of Guyana. I regard them both as unsung heroines.    Continue reading

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