Tag Archives: Africa

Pope Francis in America – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Pope Francis in America – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Pope Francis1We come from everywhere Africa, Europe, Asia, Latin America We hide in the bowels of ships And stowaway in the cargo of planes Dodge bullets and run from dogs And get nightmares about fences and walls

We do these things and more To experience the land of liberty-and dreams And to provide for our families So they too can say they are Americans

We are no scum or dreg We heal the sick, mop the floors Tend the gardens, harvest the crops Throw out the garbage, push wheelchairs Babysit and become surrogate moms   Continue reading

Sugar in the Blood: A Family’s Story of Slavery and Empire by Andrea Stuart – reviews

Sugar in the Blood: A Family’s Story of Slavery and Empire by Andrea Stuart – review

Sugar in the BloodAn absorbing but uneven family memoir taking in both sides of the Barbadian slave trade and its legacy — (www.theguardian.com review)

Modern Britain was built on sugar; there is hardly a manufacturing town on these shores that was not in some way connected with the “Africa trade”. The glittering prosperity of slave ports such as Bristol and Liverpool was derived in large part from commerce with Africa.

In the heyday of the British slave trade, from 1700 to 1808, West Indians (as white sugar barons were then known) became conspicuous by their new wealth. Often they cast Barbados or Jamaica aside like a sucked orange in order to fritter their profits in England. A popular melodrama of 1771, Richard Cumberland’s The West Indian, satirised planters as drunken layabouts in ostentatiously buckled shoes and hats.   Continue reading

To make it big in Africa, a business must succeed in Nigeria, the continent’s largest market.

Africa’s testing ground

To make it big in Africa, a business must succeed in Nigeria, the continent’s largest market. No one said it would be easy

Aug 23rd 2014 | LAGOS |The Economist

nigeria-1IN 2001 MTN, a fledgling telecoms company from South Africa, paid $285m for one of four mobile licences sold at auction by the government of Nigeria. Observers thought its board was bonkers. Nigeria had spent most of the previous four decades under military rule. The country was rich in oil reserves but otherwise desperately poor. Its infrastructure was crumbling. The state phone company had taken a century to amass a few hundred thousand customers from a population of 120m. The business climate was scarcely stable.  Continue reading

5 Reasons Jamaican Culture Is the Most Popular Per Capita

5 Reasons Jamaican Culture Is the Most Popular Per Capita

Prince Harry race Usain Bolt in a short sprint

Jamaican Patois becoming the youth language of choice in larger countries

In some parts of England and Toronto Canada, a dialect heavy with Jamaican and Afro-Caribbean inflections is being spoken by a significant portion of the youth population. British linguists are calling it “multicultural youth English,” or MYE.

Jamaican Creole, or JamC , what the academics are now calling the patois native to Jamaica, has become the dialect employed not just by the children of Jamaican immigrants, but also by second-generation West Indians of other national origins (i.e. of Trinidadian, Grenadian, Guyanese, etc. parentage) and simultaneously by Black youth of various African heritage. For British-born, urban Black people, JamC became a code used as a marker of Black identity with sociolinguistic functions similar to African-American vernacular English in the United States.

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United Nations Pageant seeks inner beauty to promote tourism, goodwill and cultural style.

Wednesday, July 16, 2014 Tangerine Clarke

United Nations Pageant seeks inner beauty to promote tourism, goodwill and cultural style.

Pageants typically focus on external beauty, glitz and glamour.  However, the United Nations Pageant hosted in Kingston, Jamaica seeks goodwill ambassadors.

The United Nations Pageant is an international event, dedicated to identifying and showcasing the best tourism and ambassadors of humanity. Contestants are scored on inner beauty or how they relate with others, and show support towards community service. Contestants from Africa, South America, India, the United States and the Caribbean converged from July 1st through the 6th, 2014. This was an opportunity for comradery, community service and cultural expression.

Leon Williams, the United Nations Pageant president, explained “Unknown to the contestants, we had judges socialize and mingle with them during the early days of the pageant.  The judges were revealed later on day three of the pageant and participated in activities with the contestants throughout the week. This provided opportunity to know each contestant personably. During this part of the process, a person can excel at the finals –but not get along with others; and this will hinder their chance to win. This opportunity offers more than a pageant title.  The winners become ambassadors who foster goodwill and help those less fortunate. Retrospectively, we also look at contributions each contestant has offered in their home community. Humanitarianism is a strong indicator of good character.
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The danger of a single story – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding. About Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie 

Obama’s Complete Nelson Mandela Memorial Speech

Obama’s Complete Nelson Mandela Memorial Speech

 Dec 10, 2013 – President Barack Obama’s full speech at memorial service today for Nelson Mandela.

Coolies – How Britain reinvented slavery – video

Coolies – How Britain reinvented slavery – video

Watch the 60 minutes documentary here.

Coolies: How Britain Reinvented Slavery tells the astonishing and controversial story of the systematic recruitment and migration of over a million Indians to all corners of the Empire. It is a chapter in colonial history that implicates figures at the very highest level of the British establishment and has defined the demographic shape of the modern world.

Combining archive footage and historical evidence the programme includes interviews with Gandhi’s great-granddaughter, Uma Dhupelia-Mesthrie, about Gandhi’s campaign to end indentured labour and David Dabydeen – author and academic – whose great-grandfather was an indentured labourer in British Guyana.

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