Tag Archives: Essequibo

Venezuela begins cutting ties with Guyana; warns it won’t back down in border dispute

Venezuela begins cutting ties with Guyana; warns it won’t back down in border dispute

Nicolas Maduro

VENEZUELA’S PRESIDENT NICOLAS MADURO SPEAKS AT THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY IN CARACAS

CARACAS, Venezuela, Wednesday July 8, 2015 – “We are victims of dispossession. I say this to our friends and also to our enemies: No one will ever get Venezuela to renounce her historical rights to the Essequibo.”

With those words, and the announcement that Venezuela is recalling its ambassador in Guyana Reyna Margarita Arratia, reviewing relations with that CARICOM nation, and scaling down embassy staff in Georgetown, President Nicolás Maduro sent a strong message to his neighbour that his country would not be backing down from its claims of maritime territory.   Continue reading

Guyana: Capitol TV News Videos: 17 April 2015

Guyana:  Capitol TV News Videos: 17 April 2015

  • Barry Dataram held in 100 kilo cocaine bust
  • Main parties complain of intimidation, destruction of campaign material
  • Dynamic Airways passengers face 24-hour delay
  • Opposition coalition to hold Women’s Rally in Georgetown Saturday
  • First Swiss Honorary Consul appointed
  • Guyanese man found guilty, sentenced in Canada’s Eaton Centre shooting
  • Essequibo businessman speaks out against PPP
  • Sports

Click links below to view the TV News Videos

Barry Dataram held in 100 kilo cocaine bust

Posted: 17 Apr 2015 05:09 PM PDT   Continue reading

Venezuela’s relations with Guyana – commentary

Venezuela’s relations with Guyana

Guyana -Venezuela - Disputed territoryMARCH 8, 2015 · BY Stabroek News – Editorial

The week before last Takuba Lodge issued a press release stating that Foreign Minister Delcy Rodríguez of Venezuela had raised an objection with the Country Manager of Esso Exploration and Production Guyana Ltd about the dispatch of an oil rig from Louisiana to an exploratory concession granted by the Government of Guyana.

The site identified for the drilling is called Liza, which is located off the coast of Demerara within the Stabroek Block. Needless to say, it is situated well within Guyana’s waters, and while Venezuela’s spurious claim to this country’s land space has never encompassed territory east of the Essequibo River, the Stabroek Block does extend into offshore Essequibo. The implications of this, one supposes, is the primary reason for Venezuela’s objection.

The latest protest from our western neighbour follows an ingrained pattern whereby it has attempted to thwart any major development on land or sea in Essequibo over the past few decades, be it a hydroelectric project, a spaceport, or an exploratory concession for oil.   Continue reading

History of the Postal Service in Guyana – By Dmitri Allicock

 Postal Service-1

History of the Postal Service in Guyana

By Dmitri Allicock

The French during their occupation in 1782 established the first postal service in historical Guyana. ‘They announced that a ship will sail for France eight or ten times every year by which anyone can send a letter to other countries.

With the dawn of this age of instant internet communication and gadgetry it is easy to forget centuries of the Postal Service of Guyana which was once regarded as an essential instrument of nation building that adapted very well to serve alongside radio, telegraph, telephone and changing technology.    Continue reading

Venezuela releases oil research ship arrested in Guyanese waters

Captured survey ship Teknik Perdana with Venezuelan warship

Captured survey ship Teknik Perdana with Venezuelan warship

Venezuela releases oil research ship arrested in Guyanese waters

Tuesday, 15 October 2013 – Demerara Waves

(BBC).-The owners of a US-contracted oil ship which was detained by the Venezuelan navy on Thursday say the vessel has been released.

The Venezuelan navy had boarded the Teknik Perdana on Thursday in disputed waters off the coast of Guyana and sailed it to Venezuela’s Margarita island.

Caracas accused the crew of operating illegally in Venezuelan waters.

Its owners said all 36 crew, among them five US citizens, had been released.    Continue reading

The Chinese In Guyana – by Peter Halder

The Chinese In Guyana

By Peter Halder

 Introduction

    African slavery provided free labor for the sugar industry in what was then British Guiana. Slavery was abolished in 1834. The freed slaves jubilantly left the plantations and the inhuman treatment meted out to them to seek a new future of their own choosing. That created a vacuum in the sugar industry and an immediate need and demand for cheap labor. The plantocracy in collaboration with the colonial administration first brought Portuguese from Madeira, Portugal. They were found to be unsuitable. They were replaced by Chinese from Canton in China.

 Chinese Arrival

    January 12, 2013 marked the 160th Anniversary of the arrival of Chinese in Guyana.

[Read more: The Chinese In Guyana]

The Demerara Slave Uprising and the Trial of Rev. John Smith- by Odeen Ishmael

Guyana Documentary History Series

British Parliamentary Debate on the

Trial of Rev. John Smith

Edited by Odeen Ishmael

Introduction: By Odeen Ishmael

The Demerara Slave Uprising and the trial of Rev. John Smith

From around the closing years of the eighteenth century some organisations were established in England to campaign for the abolition of slavery in the British colonies. These included the Baptist Missionary Society, the London Missionary Society, the Church Missionary Society, the Britisha nd Foreign Bible Society, the Methodist Society, and the Anti-Slavery Society formed in 1823.

The Anti-Slavery Society was very influential since among its members were the Quakers and important Members of Parliament including William Wilberforce, Thomas Clarkson and Fowell Buxton. In April 1823 Buxton presented a motion in the House of Commons calling for a gradual abolition of slavery in all British colonies, but it was defeated because the majority felt that the abolition of slavery would leave the planters without a labour force. Instead, measures to ameliorate the condition of slaves were adopted. These ordered that female slaves should not be whipped as punishment and drivers should not carry whips in the field.    Continue reading

History of Christmas In Guyana – by Peter Halder

History of Christmas In Guyana

by Peter Halder

The observation and celebration of Christmas in Guyana dates back to the 17th century. It began, circa 1627, among the Dutch immigrants who had established permanent settlements in Essequibo. The celebration later spread to Berbice in 1627 and then Demerara in 1746.

The counties of Essequibo, Demerara and Berbice, which subsequently became British as a result of European wars, were merged in 1831 and became British Guiana.

In the new British colony, the largest ethnic population were African slaves captured by British and Dutch slave ships and brought to Guyana to work on colonial sugar plantations.   Read More »

This is just one of many  historical articles on Guyana written by Peter Halder that will be published on Guyanese Online.  You can read them all at Peter Halder’s website:  http://peterhalder.wordpress.com/

Remnants Of The Early Dutch in Guyana – 1616-1815 – By Dmitri Allicock

Remnants Of The Early Dutch in Guyana  – 1616-1815 – By Dmitri Allicock

Flag - Dutch West Indian Company

Flag – Dutch West Indian Company

Guyana is the only English-speaking country in South America, but English has been the official language for less than half the time Europeans occupied the country. The Dutch language was the main medium of communication for 232 years, from the time a group of Dutchmen sailed up the Pomeroon River and settled there, to 1812 when English replaced Dutch as the language used in the Court of Policy (Parliament). To this day, hundreds of villages have retained their original Dutch names like Uitvlugt, Vergenoegen and Zeeburg. Some present-day Guyanese have names like Westmaas, Van Lange and Meertens. No Guyanese citizen or visitor can escape visible and other reminders of our Dutch predecessors.

The ruins of a brick fort can still be seen on a little island where the Essequibo, Mazaruni and Cuyuni rivers meet. The original fort was a wooden structure built around 1600 by some Dutch traders who called it Kyk-over-al or “See-over-all” because it provided a commanding view of the three rivers.      Continue reading

How do people know you? – by Ron Persaud

How do people know you?

By Ron Persaud

Recently I had to reflect on the Guyanese custom of not using a person’s name – “full mouth” – as they say. My maternal grandmother was referred to as ‘Sam Mai’; her elder sister was ‘Sam Auntie’ (did you see that coming?).  Sam, my mother’s brother, was a Pandit and perhaps the most well known person in Louisiana Village – if not on the whole island of Leguan. One of my aunts would refer to her husband as ‘James’ Buddy’ – James’ brother – despite the fact that her husband’s name is William. Sometimes the appellation would go the other way. Jimmy, my cousin, was instantly placed when referred to as ‘Baranka Son’.

The nomenclature transcended generations; my father and his siblings had a  ‘Cullen Mousey’ – the wife of their father’s brother – from Cullen, Essequibo. ‘Big Mousey’ and  ‘Lil Mousey’ differentiated their other two aunts.           Continue reading

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,236 other followers

%d bloggers like this: