Tag Archives: Guyana

A Caribbean Brunch Favorite: Ackee And Codfish – By Minna LaFortune

A Caribbean Brunch Favorite: Ackee And Codfish

Published on Mar 31 2016,  News Americas. NY
ackee-and-saltfish

A Caribbean Brunch Favorite: Ackee And Codfish

News Americas, NEW YORK, NY, Fri. April 1, 2016: Getting an invitation to attend a Caribbean breakfast or brunch is the invitation to a special experience!

Caribbean breakfast foods are very special because they are meals that are also served at lunch and dinner.

They are large meals that contain all the major food groups complimented with fresh herbs and spices and medley of several tropical fruits. To ask a Caribbean national in the region or in the Diaspora what is their favorite breakfast or brunch dish is to get a list of starches, fish, meats, vegetables, beverages and fruits.

The responses no doubt will vary from island to island.     Continue reading

Profile: Avinash Persaud: Currency Economist, Scholar, Financial Wizard! – By Dr Dhanpaul Narine

Profile: Avinash Persaud: Currency Economist, Scholar, Financial Wizard!

– By Dr Dhanpaul Narine

Avinash Persaud

Avinash Persaud

Avinash Persaud’s biography reads like that of a Nobel Prize winner. He was voted by the prestigious ‘Prospect Magazine’ as one of the top three intellectuals in the world to give advice on the financial crisis.

Avinash has had a distinguished career in the world of economics and finance and it spreads across finance, academia and public policy. He is currently a non-resident Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics in Washington and an Emeritus Professor of Gresham College and a non-executive chairman of Elara Capital PLC. Avinash is also a former Governor of the London School of Economics and the 2010 President of the British Association for the Advancement of Science 9 (Section F).    Continue reading

The Promenade Gardens, Georgetown. Guyana.

The Promenade Gardens, Georgetown. Guyana.

The Promenade Gardens is located  in the city of Georgetown, Guyana. The gardens are located between Middle and Newmarket Streets as well as between Waterloo and Carmichael Streets in the city. It stands as the perfect spot for the family and the young at heart to relax and think of mother nature’s countless blessings to the City of Georgetown.
… Photos by Alva Solomon.

The sign along Middle Street tells the story of the gardens. Republic Bank has over the years partnered with the Georgetown Municpality to maintain the Promenade Gardens.

The sign along Middle Street tells the story of the gardens. Republic Bank has over the years partnered with the Georgetown Municpality to maintain the Promenade Gardens.

 

Continue reading

IS VENEZUELA THE BIG BAD WOLF? – By Hubert Williams

IS  VENEZUELA  THE  BIG  BAD  WOLF?

By  Hubert  Williams

Boston, Massachusetts, September 23,  2015  —  At every stage of its spurious claim to nearly two-thirds of Guyana’s territory – i.e. all land west of the Essequibo River – the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela has flexed its muscles and sought to intimidate the government and people of what it considers a weak, defenceless and irritating little neighbour.

Venezuela scored a bulls-eye in London in February 1966 when the British Guiana representatives, concerned that nothing should block the country’s path to independence, allowed themselves to be beguiled by the British in the resurrection (to the delight of the Venezuelans) of a boundary dispute that in 1899 had been determined by an international tribunal to have been fully, perfectly and finally settled.   Continue reading

E-governance contract: AXE THE DAX – By Ralph Ramkarran

AXE THE DAX

Posted on May 2, 2015   –  by

Ralph Ramkarran

Ralph Ramkarran

In 1962 the slogan ‘axe the tax’ became well known in then British Guiana. The United Force adopted it in its campaign against a tax on beer in the Kaldor Budget and against the PPP Government. The campaign was the beginning of a successful three-year, multi-national effort, marked by tremendous violence and property damage, to remove the PPP from office.

 The PPP had justice on its side in 1962 but in terms of strategy and public relations, shot itself in the foot. Fifty years later, shooting itself in the foot has become an occupational hazard for the PPP and its Governments.   Continue reading

ON ETHNICITY – by Ralph Ramkarran

ON ETHNICITY

Ralph Ramkarran

Ralph Ramkarran

Posted on April 11, 2015  – by

I must confess that I have had an ambivalent attitude to ethnicity for most of my life. My mother was a Hindu and so were all my relatives on both sides of my family. I grew up in the midst of celebrations of Hindu religious festivals, tempered by the dominant influence of the Lutheran Church in my mixed community, as in much of Guyana.  Even though I was socialized as a Hindu and, therefore, considered myself, whatever the reality, as Indian by race, my approach to my own ethnicity was determined by factors that had little to do with high principle.

In my mid to late teenage years after I discovered girls, I unconsciously developed a certain approach on the issue of ethnicity, dictated by my dark complexion and curly hair which caused me to be viewed in a particular way.   Continue reading

Guyana Elections: Accepting the Election Results – by Ralph Ramkarran

ACCEPTING THE ELECTION RESULTS

Ralph Ramkarran

Ralph Ramkarran

Posted on April 4, 2015  – by

Since the restoration of free and fair elections in Guyana, the only election results that have been accepted were those of 1992, even though they, and most other elections since then, were accompanied by violence, particularly after the elections. The Opposition castigated the 2011 elections alleging ‘discrepancies,’ although admitting that the results would not have been affected. The PPP went further and alleged that the 2011 elections were rigged against it.

The consequences of the failure to accept election results have been devastating to Guyana. It results, after most elections, in serious post-election violence, which causes damage to property, injury and loss to innocent people and harm to Guyana. It further exacerbates ethnic tension, which the elections campaign would already have whipped up, drives fear in the population and generates a feeling of uncertainty in the minds of investors.   Continue reading

Madeiran Portuguese Migration to Guyana, St. Vincent, Antigua and Trinidad – By Jo-Anne S. Ferreira

Madeiran Portuguese Migration to Guyana, St. Vincent, Antigua and Trinidad:

A Comparative Overview

Madeira Island click for info

Madeira Island click for more info – Wikipedia also click map to enlarge

By Jo-Anne S. Ferreira – University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad.

THIS PAPER REPRESENTS a preliminary exploration of Madeiran migration to the Anglophone Caribbean.1 It seeks to consider the phenomenon of Madeiran migration in the context of the wider Anglophone Caribbean by comparing and contrasting the waves of Madeiran migration across the region, including the extent and rate of cultural assimilation in each new home of Madeiran migrants. Apart from the primary sources available for the Portuguese community of Trinidad, mainly secondary sources have been used and assessed for the other territories as an initial basis for comparison. This is done particularly where the experiences of migrants have been reportedly similar.2

During the 140 years of Madeiran Portuguese migration to the Anglophone Caribbean, a period lasting from 1835 to 1975, Portuguese and Luso-West Indians have remained a minority group within the wider host societies.   Continue reading

Jagdeo and the PPP – Lifestyle and Politics – by Ralph Ramkarran

JAGDEO AND THE PPP – LIFESTYLE AND POLITICS

Ralph Ramkarran

Ralph Ramkarran

Posted on March 21, 2015 –  by

In an article for my blog, www.conversationtree.gy, published in SN last Sunday, I took issue with a statement by former President Jagdeo that implied that Cheddi and Janet Jagan lived in luxury. His argument that the Jagans lived such a lifestyle, comparable to his own at the time his house was built, was an attempt to justify his own Cadillac lifestyle, which over the past few years has come under severe scrutiny and criticism.

There were outraged responses by many people to Jagdeo’s statement, including from Clem Seecharran and, more indirectly, Peter Fraser, two distinguished Guyanese historians living and working in the UK. But the most telling came from Nadira Jagan-Brancier, the Jagan daughter, Dr. Tulsie Dyal Singh and Sadie Amin. Dr. Singh, who conferred with Dr Jagan about his medical condition just before he died and visited his home, said that his own family home in Palmyra on the Corentyne when he was growing up in the 1950s was of similar size to the Jagan home. Sadie Amin gave a description of the modest lifestyle and home of the Jagans, including its leaking roof.   Continue reading

The Hindus of the Caribbean: An Appreciation – by Murali Balaji

The Hindus of the Caribbean: An Appreciation

Posted: 02/13/2015 2:33 pm EST –  – Director of Education and Curriculum Reform, Hindu American Foundation – HuffingtonPost.com

Nataraja Hinduism symbolOn May 5, 1838, the Whitby, a British ship docked in British Guiana (now known as Guyana) with 249 human cargo after a nearly three-month voyage from the Port of Calcutta in India. Along the way, many of those on board were abused by the ship’s crew, and five died.

The Whitby was the first of many chartered ships that would bring Indians — mostly poor Hindus from rural northern India — to work on the sugar cane plantations in the British West Indies. Over the next 80 years, more than 500,000 Indians would make the trip to the Caribbean as indentured servants, primarily to places such as Guyana and Trinidad. Their story — shaped by the trauma of Transatlantic migration, struggles in a new environment, and eventually the triumph of forging a distinct identity — continues to be an overlooked part of colonial history.  Continue reading

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