Tag Archives: India

History: The British economy depended on the Caribbean

The British economy depended on the Caribbean 

From Book: “The War for America” – by Piers Mackesy. 

For the British, the American Revolution quickly became a naval war with France over possession of the islands of the Caribbean. With their vast sugar plantations, these were more lucrative to Britain than the American colonies and more likely to remain colonies over the long run. Furthermore, the French had lost key Caribbean possessions to Britain during the recent French and Indian War that had ended in 1763, and viewed the American Revolution as their opportunity to regain them:

“Why this obsession [of the British] with the West Indies? [Lord] Sandwich had predicted that the war aims of France would be to overturn the peace of 1763 and regain her empire and her markets; and that for the sake of the American alliance she would forget her claim to Canada, and look for her reward in the sub-tropics — in India, West Africa and the Caribbean. And he was right.       Continue reading

Book: Drink from My Calabash – by Naraine Datt

Book: Drink from My Calabash 

The calabash or bottle gourd (not to be confused with the calabaza) is a vine grown for its fruit, which can either be harvested young and used as a vegetable or harvested mature, dried, and used as a bottle, utensil, or pipe. For this reason, one of the calabash subspecies is known as the bottle gourd. The fresh fruit has a light green smooth skin and a white flesh. However the rounder varieties are called Calabash gourds whereas the longer and slimmer kinds are usually well known as bottle gourds. The calabash was one of the first cultivated plants in the world, grown not for food but as a container. It was named for the calabash tree (Crescentia cujete).     Continue reading

Guyana’s Natural Resources: Zero Tolerance for Vaitarna and Bai Shan Lin – xpressblogg.com

Guyana- loggingOpinion - commentary -analysisThe sudden decision by China to provide aid to Guyana was hardly puzzling.

We knew that another principle of distributive justice was at work; one that was not formally articulated, perhaps deliberately muted because of the disparate goals of the parties at the deal table.

The world was already watching on at the not so subtle creep of China into the Caribbean and surrounding countries that shared the same dependency on foreign aid because the choices of their post colonial leaders – selfish governance, greed, corruption – led to economic underdevelopment and stagnation that left these countries sitting on potential they were unable to develop.

India, its equally insidious partner, was hot on its heels and did not go unnoticed, either.    Continue reading

TASSA THUNDER: Folk Music from India to the Caribbean – video

TASSA THUNDER : Folk Music from India to the Caribbean – YouTube

Published on Mar 25, 2014    – Vibert Cambridge shared this link.

This 53-minute video documentary explores Indo-Caribbean music culture through focusing on a set of neo-traditional music genres, relating them to sources and counterparts in North India’s Bhojpuri region and Indian communities in Fiji. Topics covered include chutney, chowtal, birha, nagara drumming, Ahir dance, the dantal, the Alha-Udal epic, and most extensively, tassa drumming. Tassa music is explored in reference to its rhythmic structures, its performance contexts of weddings, competitions, and Muharram (Hosay), and the construction of its drums. The film combines unique performance footage and interviews taken between 1990 and 2010 in India, Trinidad, Guyana, Suriname, New York, and Fijian communities in California. It conveys how Indo-Caribbean music culture comprises a unique and dynamic combination of both resilient marginal survivals as well as innovative forms.

The World Bank and A Changing World – By David Jessop

The World Bank and A Changing World

 By David Jessop

 the-world-bankNews Americas, LONDON, England, Tues. April 14, 12015: It is probably true to say that the average person has little idea what international financial institutions like the World Bank or International Monetary Fund (IMF) do, beyond knowing that they are in some way responsible for having governments impose tough austerity measures and conditions in return for their support.

Notwithstanding, a related issue with wide implications is emerging that warrants close attention in the Caribbean: this is the establishment of what many regard as a future rival to the World Bank in the form of the Chinese-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) with a likely different philosophy. Continue reading

Cricket: Who would win the World Cup? – By Dr. Dhanpaul Narine

Cricket: Who would win the World Cup?

2015_Cricket_World_Cup_Logo.svgBy Dr. Dhanpaul Narine –  10-February-2015

Beyond the ball destiny lies. Stars and legends are made. Cricket’s extravaganza begins and New Zealand will be the team to beat. They are playing well and have the game to take on the best teams in the world.  Besides, New Zealand is peaking at the right moment and they are playing at home.

Valentine’s Day 2015 a love affair of a different sort will take place. It involves the cricket nations from fourteen countries and they will compete for cricket’s World Cup. This will be the eleventh such meeting; the first was in 1975 in England. Cricket fans will recall that West Indies won the 1975 and 1979 tournaments and lost in the 1983 finals to India at Lords.  Continue reading

Rise of common folk in Brazil, India, Indonesia – commentary

Rise of common folk in Brazil, India, Indonesia

New and popular politicians in the developing world’s largest democracies come from humble origins. This trend reflects an ‘equality of conditions,’ or free societies that come to see dignity in each individual.

Narendra Modi, the newly installed prime minister of the world’s largest democracy, India, is the low-caste son of a tea-stall owner.

Joko Widodo, the president-elect of the third largest democracy, Indonesia, was a furniture maker only a decade ago.

And Marina Silva, the most popular candidate in a presidential race in the fourth largest democracy, Brazil, grew up in poverty in an Amazon jungle town. As a child, she tapped rubber trees and taught herself to read at age 16.

Picture: Presidential candidate Marina Silva of the Brazilian Socialist Party speaks during a Sept. 8 campaign visit to the Unibes Foundation which offers aid to the needy.

Continue reading

United Nations Pageant seeks inner beauty to promote tourism, goodwill and cultural style.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Guyanese Online News
Wednesday, July 16, 2014 Tangerine Clarke

United Nations Pageant seeks inner beauty to promote tourism, goodwill and cultural style.

Pageants typically focus on external beauty, glitz and glamour.  However, the United Nations Pageant hosted in Kingston, Jamaica seeks goodwill ambassadors.

The United Nations Pageant is an international event, dedicated to identifying and showcasing the best tourism and ambassadors of humanity. Contestants are scored on inner beauty or how they relate with others, and show support towards community service. Contestants from Africa, South America, India, the United States and the Caribbean converged from July 1st through the 6th, 2014. This was an opportunity for comradery, community service and cultural expression.

Leon Williams, the United Nations Pageant president, explained “Unknown to the contestants, we had judges socialize and mingle with them during the early days of the pageant.  The judges were revealed later on day three of the pageant and participated in activities with the contestants throughout the week. This provided opportunity to know each contestant personably. During this part of the process, a person can excel at the finals –but not get along with others; and this will hinder their chance to win. This opportunity offers more than a pageant title.  The winners become ambassadors who foster goodwill and help those less fortunate. Retrospectively, we also look at contributions each contestant has offered in their home community. Humanitarianism is a strong indicator of good character.
Continue reading

Cricket: ICC proposes sweeping changes for the game

Cricket: A new Imperium – Sweeping changes for the game

Stabroek News – 27 January 2014 – Tomorrow, the Board of the International Cricket Council (ICC) will begin deliberations on a proposal by its Finance & Commercial Affairs (FCA) committee for sweeping and astonishing changes in the way the game is run and how tours are scheduled. At the core of the proposal is that India, Australia and England would take charge of the game and that they would be immune to relegation in the two-tiered system that is also being promulgated.

It is in essence the cricketing version of the permanent five of the United Nations Security Council, as regressive and in need of urgent reform as that model is. And just as the permanent five were installed as the victors at the end of the Second World War, it is proposed that these three be ordained on the basis of the money they bring to the game and the level of the public interest in their teams.   Continue reading

Holi or Phagwah + Phagwah songs – 13 videos autoplay

HOLI or Phagwah – Festival of Colours


Holi
(Hindi: होली, Nepali: होली,Punjabi: ਹੋਲੀ Sindhi: هولي) is a religious spring festival celebrated by Hindus as a festival of colours.

It is primarily observed in India and Nepal. It is also observed by the minority Hindus in Bangladesh and Pakistan as well in countries with large Indic diaspora populations following Hinduism, such as Suriname, Malaysia, Guyana, South Africa, Trinidad and Tobago, the United Kingdom, the United States, Mauritius, and Fiji.

Holi is also known as Phagwah (Assamese: ফাকুৱা), Festival of Colours, or Doḷajātra (Oriya: ଦୋଳଯାତ୍ରା) in Odisha, and as Dol Jatra (Bengali: দোলযাত্রা) or Basantotsav (“spring festival”) (Bengali: বসন্তোৎসব) in West Bengal and Assam.            Continue reading

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