Tag Archives: Trinidad

Caribbean: A Ferry Between the Islands? Two to Set Sail Soon

Ferry Between the Islands? Two Soon to Set Sail

  AUGUST 4, 2016

ferryTHE DREAM JET EXPRESS IS ONE OF TWO FERRIES THAT THE CARIBBEAN FERRY SERVICE SAYS SHOULD BE ON THE SEAS BY YEAR-END. (PHOTO CREDIT: NATIONNEWS.COM)

BRIDGETOWN, Barbados, Thursday August 4, 2016 – A long-awaited passenger ferry service linking some islands of the Caribbean could be setting sail by year-end. But wait, it may not be the only one.

While the Barbados-registered Caribbean Ferry Service is in the process of finalizing paperwork to operate two vessels, another effort is being made to get a double decker ferry with a capacity of 350 to travel within the southern Caribbean.

According to the Nation newspaper in Barbados, Caribbean Ferry Service will operate The Dream Jet Express and The Opal Jet Express, for travel and cargo.   Continue reading

TASSA THUNDER: Folk Music from India to the Caribbean – video

TASSA THUNDER : Folk Music from India to the Caribbean – YouTube

Published on Mar 25, 2014    – Vibert Cambridge shared this link.

This 53-minute video documentary explores Indo-Caribbean music culture through focusing on a set of neo-traditional music genres, relating them to sources and counterparts in North India’s Bhojpuri region and Indian communities in Fiji. Topics covered include chutney, chowtal, birha, nagara drumming, Ahir dance, the dantal, the Alha-Udal epic, and most extensively, tassa drumming. Tassa music is explored in reference to its rhythmic structures, its performance contexts of weddings, competitions, and Muharram (Hosay), and the construction of its drums. The film combines unique performance footage and interviews taken between 1990 and 2010 in India, Trinidad, Guyana, Suriname, New York, and Fijian communities in California. It conveys how Indo-Caribbean music culture comprises a unique and dynamic combination of both resilient marginal survivals as well as innovative forms.

Venezuela’s Changing Relationship With CARICOM – By David Jessop

Venezuela’s Changing Relationship With CARICOM – By David Jessop

Maduro at UN

News Americas, LONDON, England, Tues. Nov. 10, 2015: As with so much in politics it is often what is not seen, said or fully understood that drives events. This is particularly so in the case of Venezuela’s changing relationship with the countries of CARICOM.

In recent months Caracas has been deepening its sub-regional relations and has escalated its border dispute with Guyana. It has also encouraged CARICOM to be less than emphatic in its support for Georgetown’s position.

At the same time, it has been moving rapidly to consolidate its relationship with, in particular, the OECS, Trinidad and Suriname by offering increased levels of support or investments, largely through its concessional PetroCaribe oil and development assistance programs.  Continue reading

NO MUSICAL ENGINE HERE – by Dave Martins.

Dave Martins

Dave Martins

NO MUSICAL ENGINE HERE – by Dave Martins.

Following recent musical explorations in the country, including Dr. Vibert Cambridge’s excellent book, “Musical Life in Guyana”, the current depressed state of our music industry is once again a topic of discussion. We are hearing renewed calls for more music education in the schools, and for ways to make instruments more affordable.

A well-known music teacher stressed the need to identify and foster singular musical talent. Some have called for the creation of a Guyanese “national sound”, and there has been the inevitable shout for government funding for music studios and facilities. It is fair to say that, particularly following Dr. Cambridge’s book, serious concerns have been raised about the state of our music industry today.  Continue reading

Madeiran Portuguese Migration to Guyana, St. Vincent, Antigua and Trinidad – By Jo-Anne S. Ferreira

Madeiran Portuguese Migration to Guyana, St. Vincent, Antigua and Trinidad:

A Comparative Overview

Madeira Island click for info

Madeira Island click for more info – Wikipedia also click map to enlarge

By Jo-Anne S. Ferreira – University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad.

THIS PAPER REPRESENTS a preliminary exploration of Madeiran migration to the Anglophone Caribbean.1 It seeks to consider the phenomenon of Madeiran migration in the context of the wider Anglophone Caribbean by comparing and contrasting the waves of Madeiran migration across the region, including the extent and rate of cultural assimilation in each new home of Madeiran migrants. Apart from the primary sources available for the Portuguese community of Trinidad, mainly secondary sources have been used and assessed for the other territories as an initial basis for comparison. This is done particularly where the experiences of migrants have been reportedly similar.2

During the 140 years of Madeiran Portuguese migration to the Anglophone Caribbean, a period lasting from 1835 to 1975, Portuguese and Luso-West Indians have remained a minority group within the wider host societies.   Continue reading

The Hindus of the Caribbean: An Appreciation – by Murali Balaji

The Hindus of the Caribbean: An Appreciation

Posted: 02/13/2015 2:33 pm EST –  – Director of Education and Curriculum Reform, Hindu American Foundation – HuffingtonPost.com

Nataraja Hinduism symbolOn May 5, 1838, the Whitby, a British ship docked in British Guiana (now known as Guyana) with 249 human cargo after a nearly three-month voyage from the Port of Calcutta in India. Along the way, many of those on board were abused by the ship’s crew, and five died.

The Whitby was the first of many chartered ships that would bring Indians — mostly poor Hindus from rural northern India — to work on the sugar cane plantations in the British West Indies. Over the next 80 years, more than 500,000 Indians would make the trip to the Caribbean as indentured servants, primarily to places such as Guyana and Trinidad. Their story — shaped by the trauma of Transatlantic migration, struggles in a new environment, and eventually the triumph of forging a distinct identity — continues to be an overlooked part of colonial history.  Continue reading

Research study: The impact of migration on the reproductive health of women – HELP!

Research study: The impact of migration on the reproductive health of women – HELP!

From: Shamelle Richards: shamelle@uw.edu

 To Guyanese Online: 

Thank you for your help! It is deeply appreciated.

Here is the basic introduction to my project:

I am an undergraduate student researcher in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Washington. My specialization is medical anthropology.

I am currently looking for participants for a research study examining the impact of migration on the reproductive health of women from the English-speaking Caribbean. Studies have shown that immigrants from the non-Hispanic Caribbean have some of the worst pregnancy-related reproductive health outcomes, including an increased risk for pre-term births, low birth weight infants, and gestational diabetes. Women from Guyana and Trinidad are particularly vulnerable.  Continue reading

Hindu Communities in Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad, South Africa, Fiji, and East Africa

New Homelands: Hindu Communities in Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad, South Africa, Fiji, and East Africa

Book  305 pages – By Paul Younger
Book cover New Homelands: Hindu Communities in Mauritius, Guyana, Trinidad, South Africa, Fiji, and East Africa

When the colonial slave trade, and then slavery itself, were abolished early in the 19th century, the British empire brazenly set up a new system of trade using Indian rather than African laborers. The new system of “indentured” labor was supposed to be different from slavery because the indenture, or contract, was written for an initial period of five years and involved fixed wages and some specified conditions of work.
From the workers’ point of view, the one redeeming feature of the system was that most of their workmates spoke their language and came from the same area of India. Because this allowed them to develop some sense of community, by the end of the initial five years most of the Indian laborers chose to stay in the land to which they had been taken. In time that land became the place in which they joined with others to build a new homeland.
Continue reading

Christmas – Calypso Soca Parang Mix from Trinidad – music

–  More  Kaiso – Parang for Christmas…

Listen- Enjoy! …. and pass it on….     

. Continue reading

Top 6 countries that grew rich by enslaving black people

http://sfbayview.com/2013/top-6-countries-that-grew-filthy-rich-from-enslaving-black-people/

 TOP 6 COUNTRIES THAT GREW FILTHY RICH FROM ENSLAVING BLACK PEOPLE

 October 27, 2013  –  By Atlanta Black Star staff

The United States of America

Enslaved Blacks picking cotton

Their unpaid labor created the fabulous wealth that is traded here (below).

Slavery transformed America into an economic power. The exploitation of Black people for free labor made the South the richest and most politically powerful region in the country. British demand for American cotton made the southern stretch of the Mississippi River the Silicon Valley of its era, boasting the single largest concentration of the nation’s millionaires.

But slavery was a national enterprise. Many firms on Wall Street, such as JPMorgan Chase, New York Life and now-defunct Lehman Brothers, made fortunes from investing in the slave trade, the most profitable economic activity in New York’s 350-year history. Slavery was so important to the city that New York was one of the most pro-slavery urban municipalities in the North.

England             Continue reading

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